Museum and Library Closures

The New-York Historical Society will be closed on September 23, and select spaces will be closed September 24. For details, please visit our calendar.

The New-York Historical Society and NYC Media, the official network of the City of New York, have partnered to produce a special series of 90 one-minute videos that feature the staff of the New-York Historical Society as they answer some of the most captivating questions ever posed to them about the City’s fascinating and unique history. And now, the series has been nominated for a New York Emmy award!

 Yes. In July 1869, Edward Zane Carroll Judson, of Stamford, or "Ned Buntline," discovered Cody at Fort McPherson, Nebraska. That December, The New York Weekly published Judson's first installment of "Buffalo Bill, Kind of the Border Men." Judson himself was no shrinking violet and has been variously described as a sailor, soldier, drunk, temperance advocate, outdoorsman, marksman, bigamist, con-artist, newspaper editor and showman.

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 In 1962, Traffic Commissioner Henry Barnes instituted a short-lived traffic management system that required cars to stop at both cross-streets and intersections to allow pedestrians to cross diagonally from corner to corner. The ensuing confusion was called by some critis the "Barnes Dance." Others insisted that the name resulted from the joy felt by newly-safe walkers who danced in the streets.

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 In the nineteenth century, tenements did not have adequate bathrooms, and commercial bathhouses were out of reach for the city's poor. In 1851 the first public bathhouse opened on Mott Street, and in 1901 the city's first free, year-round bathhouse opened on Rivington Street. Some bathhhouses became meeting places for gay men, and others remain popular for cultural or religious reasons to this day.

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 The honor goes to Cynthia Leonard, who joined presidential candidate Belva Lockwood's 1888 campaign on the National Equal Rights Party ticket. Leonard wanted to break public utility monopolies, provide free housing for the poor, and disallow "any great poverty or great wealth." The mother of the celebrated theater star Lillian Russell, Leonard also advocated for publicly sponsored performances that would include free meals.

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 Despite close competition, that distinction belongs to the "Boy Mayor," John Purroy Mitchel. Born in 1879, he was a mere 34-years-old when elected in 1913. Unfortunately, Mitchel's re-election bid failed and he was later killed in a 1918 air corps training accident after neglecting to fasten his seatbelt.

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The Doctor's Riot of 1788 began when a curious boy observed a dissecction and then discovered his very recently-deceased mother's body was missing. Rioters destroyed laboratories in the New-York Hospital, chased the doctors into City Jail, and ransacked their homes in search of cadavers they believed had been stolen for dissection. Five of the mob were killed by the militia. 

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Creative: Tronvig Group