The New-York Historical Society and NYC Media, the official network of the City of New York, have partnered to produce a special series of 90 one-minute videos that feature the staff of the New-York Historical Society as they answer some of the most captivating questions ever posed to them about the City’s fascinating and unique history. And now, the series has been nominated for a New York Emmy award!

 Jones' Wood, a parcel of land located along the East River between 66th and 75th Streets, was the site originally proposed for New York's (not) Central Park. When the heirs of owner John Jones refused to sell the land to the city, an alternative proposal for a large park in the middle of the city gained support.

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 There are two Statues of Liberty in New York City. One stands i new York Harbor. A replica of "Lady Liberty" has graced the Brooklyn Museum's Sculpture Garden since 2002. She is thirty feet tall and was commissioned by William H. Flattau in 1900 to stand atop his building, the Liberty Warehouse in Manhattan. Other Statues of Liberty are found throughout the world, including two in Paris, France.

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Although the process of weathering that turned the copper covering of the 1886 Statue of Liberty from brown to its current green was gradual, color images indicated that the transformation was complete by 1920. The early hue has lent credence to the belief that the Statue was modeled on an African-American woman, although the sculptor Bartholdi was said to have indicated that it was based on the features of his mother.

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Riker's "Corner House" was just one of many Riker's restaurants found throughout Manhattan and Queens. While it's possible that restaurateur E. William Riker was related to the Rykers from whom the City purchased the island for the fugure prison, the contrast between singular possessive—Riker's—and plural non-possessive—Rikers—suggests the two were not related.

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No definitive answers exists, but there is speculation that it borrows from the Civil War connotaion of the term "Yankee," in that the team played north of their counterparts, the New York Giants. The Yankees' other early nicknames, Hilltoppers and Highlanders, similarly drew upon geographic inspiration, but from the location of the team's first field, Hilltop Park, in Washington Heights.

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 As early as 1830, artists were attracted to Greenwich Village for its picturesque streets and architecture. Because of its unplanned layout and narrow streets, many artists compared it to Europe. Additionally, in 1831 NYU was built in the area. In the twentieth century, affordable housing, a blend of cultures and a reputation for acceptance brought a new generation of artists.

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Creative: Tronvig Group