Special Summer Offerings

Now through Labor Day enjoy an exciting array of family programs and admission discounts for museum-goers of all ages!

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The Institute for Constitutional History sponsors or co-sponsors a variety of events during the academic year. Here is a partial list of upcoming and recent events:

Upcoming Events

The Institute for Constitutional History is pleased to announce a residential summer research seminar for advanced graduate students and junior faculty, which will be co-sponsored by the Stanford Constitutional Law Center. This year’s seminar is entitled:

RELIGION AND THE CONSTITUTION

Instructors:
Michael McConnell is the Richard and Frances Mallery Professor and Director of the Constitutional Law Center at Stanford Law School, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. From 2002 to the summer of 2009, he served as a Circuit Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. He has also taught at Harvard Law School, the University of Chicago, and the University of Utah. He has published widely in the fields of constitutional law and theory, especially church and state, equal protection, and the founding. He is co-editor of three books: Religion and the Law, Christian Perspectives on Legal Thought, and The Constitution of the United States. McConnell has argued 15 cases in the Supreme Court. He served as law clerk to Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. 

Jack Rakove is the William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies and Professor of Political Science and (by courtesy) Law at Stanford University, where he has taught
since 1980. He is the author of six books, including Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution, which won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize in History, and Revolutionaries: A
New History of the Invention of America
, which was a finalist for the George Washington Prize. He is currently at work on two books: A Politician Thinking: The Creative Mind of James Madison, and Beyond Belief, Beyond Conscience: The Radical Significance of the Free Exercise of Religion.

Program Content:
This seminar will combine discussion of works-in-progress by the participants (on a variety of subjects) with a focused set of conversations about religion in the American Republic. We will
examine the relation between the principles of religious freedom embodied in the First Amendment to the Constitution and the growth of the spiritually active, multi-denominational, and religiously
tolerant culture that distinguishes the United States from most other societies. Seminar readings will follow a historical arc. We will begin with the emergence of practices of toleration in early modern Europe and the birth of a commitment to the free exercise of religion as a natural right in 18th-century America. After that we will examine the developing law of religion in 19th- and 20th-century America before concluding with the debates over religious accommodation that have become so controversial over the past few years. The relationship of history, law, and culture will be a subject of recurring interest.

Logistics:
The seminar will meet at Stanford Law School, from July 12–17, 2015. The Institute for Constitutional History will reimburse participants for their travel expenses (up to $350), provide
accommodation at the Munger Graduate Residence on the Stanford campus, and offer a modest stipend to cover food and additional expenses. Seminar enrollment is limited to fifteen participants.

Application Process:
Applicants for the seminar should send a copy of their curriculum vitae, a brief description (three to five pages) of the research project to be pursued during the seminar, and a short statement on how this seminar will be useful to them in their research, teaching, or professional development. Materials will be accepted until May 15, 2015, and only by email at MMarcus@nyhistory.org. Successful applicants will be notified soon thereafter.

Further Information:
For further information, please contact Maeva Marcus at (202) 994-6562 or send an email to MMarcus@nyhistory.org.

The Institute for Constitutional History is pleased to announce another seminar for advanced graduate students and junior faculty:

THE PRE AND POST-1865 CONSTITUTION

Instructor:
Mark A. Graber is a Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. He is the author of Transforming Free Speech; Rethinking Abortion; Dred Scott and the Problem of Constitutional Evil; A New Introduction to American Constitutionalism; nearly a hundred articles on constitutional law, history, development and theory; and an editor of the American Constitutionalism series.

Program Content:
This course explores the extent to which the post-Civil War Amendments made fundamental changes in the American constitutional order. Abraham Lincoln in 1863 promised “a new birth of freedom.” Many contemporary scholars believed the post-Civil War Constitution was designed to achieve that new birth of freedom by radically changing the basic design and commitments of the American constitutional order. Conservatives in 1865, however, spoke of that “Constitution as it was,” minus slavery. The Supreme Court championed this view in The Slaughter-House Cases (1873). The debate is hardly academic. As the opinions in Shelby County v. Holder (2013) demonstrate, basic contemporary regime commitments depend to a fair degree on the extent of constitutional change during the Civil War and Reconstruction. We will explore this issue by examining primary and secondary sources. The first third of the course will explore the basic commitments of the constitutional regime established in 1787 through a close reading of crucial Federalist Papers and major selections from other Federalist and anti-Federalist writings. The
second third of the course will examine the basic commitments of the constitutional regime Republicans hoped to establish in 1865 through a close reading of the debates over the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments, as well as such measures as the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and the Second Freedman’s Bureau Act. The last third of the course will look at some prominent claims that the constitutional regime was fundamentally altered during the Civil War and Reconstruction. 

Logistics:
Monday evenings, 6:00–8:00 p.m., September 21, 28, October 5, 12, 19, and 26, 2015. The seminar will meet at The George Washington University Law School, 2000 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20052.

Application Process:
The seminar is designed for graduate students and junior faculty in history, political science, law, and related disciplines. All participants will be expected to complete the assigned readings and participate in seminar discussions. Although the Institute cannot offer academic credit directly for the seminar, students may be able to earn graduate credit through their home departments by completing an independent research project in conjunction with the seminar. Please consult with your advisor and/or director of graduate studies about these possibilities. Space is limited, so applicants should send a copy of their c.v. and a short statement on how this seminar will be useful to them in their research, teaching, or professional development. Materials
will be accepted only by email at MMarcus@nyhistory.org until May 22, 2015. Successful applicants will be notified soon thereafter. For further information, please contact Maeva Marcus at (202) 994-6562 or send an email to MMarcus@nyhistory.org

Further Information:
For further information, please contact Maeva Marcus at (202) 994-6562 or send an email to MMarcus@nyhistory.org.

Additional Information:
There is no tuition or other charge for this seminar, though participants will be expected to acquire the assigned books on their own.

The Institute for Constitutional History is pleased to announce another seminar for advanced graduate students and junior faculty:

REFORM, REACTION, AND CONSTITUTIONALISM IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICA

Instructors:
Hendrik Hartog is the Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor in the History of American Law and Liberty at Princeton University. From 2006 to 2015, he was the Director of Princeton University’s
Program in American Studies. He holds a Ph.D. in the History of American Civilization from Brandeis University and a J.D. from the New York University School of Law. His publications include Public Property and Private Power: The Corporation of the City of New York in American Law, 1730–1870 (1983), Man and Wife in America: A History (2000), and Someday All This Will Be Yours: A History of Inheritance and Old Age (2012). For a decade he co-edited Studies in Legal History, the book series of the American Society for Legal History. At present he is working on
both a general history of property law and a microhistory of Gibbons v. Ogden. During the 2015-2016 academic year, he will hold a fellowship at the New-York Historical Society.

William E. Nelson, the Edward Weinfeld Professor of Law and Professor of History at New York University, received his LL.B. from NYU and his Ph.D. from Harvard. After serving as law clerk to
Justice Byron R. White of the Supreme Court in 1970, he began writing and teaching in the field of American legal history. He is the author of ten monographs, including The Legalist Reformation:
Law, Politics
, and Ideology in New York, 1920-1980, and co-author or editor of three other books. In 1981 he founded the Legal History Colloquium at NYU Law School, where nearly 100 younger
scholars have held fellowships and received graduate and post-graduate training. He has taught a broad range of courses at NYU, including constitutional law and federal jurisdiction.

Program Content:
This seminar will selectively study progressive reform efforts in America between 1920 and 1980--both their successes and their failures. The first session will focus on the 1920s, when both
reformers and conservatives conceived of reform in terms of class conflict carried out mainly in the political process; in that decade, reformers enjoyed almost no success in altering the nation's law. The second session will turn to the New Deal and will focus particularly on the issue of how much redistributive change the New Deal actually achieved prior to 1938. The third and fourth sessions will study the period from 1938 to 1968, when reformers turned to the courts and the constitution in a fight to achieve ethnic and religious equality, and the children of turn-of-the-century Catholic and Jewish immigrants entered the nation's socio-economic mainstream. The third session will focus on the impact of World War II on the nation's socio-economic structure; the fourth will turn to the Cold War. The two final sessions, still focusing on law and the constitution, will turn to the years since 1968, when equality was reconceptualized in terms of race and gender, with the fifth session examining race and the sixth, gender. Our hypothesis will be that only marginal change has again occurred. A key question throughout the seminar will be why ethnic and religious conceptions of equality succeeded in transforming law for ethnic white men, while other progressive conceptions in large part failed.

Logistics 
Friday afternoons, 2:00–4:00 p.m., October 2, 9, 16, 23, November 6, 13. The seminar will meet at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, New York City.

Application Process:
The seminar is designed for graduate students and junior faculty in history, political science, law, and related disciplines. All participants will be expected to complete the assigned readings and participate in seminar discussions. Although the Institute cannot offer academic credit directly for the seminar, students may be able to earn graduate credit through their home departments by completing an independent research project in conjunction with the seminar. Please consult with your advisor and/or director of graduate studies about these possibilities. Space is limited, so applicants should send a copy of their c.v. and a short statement on how this seminar will be useful to them in their research, teaching, or professional development. Materials will be accepted only by email at MMarcus@nyhistory.org until September 15, 2015. Successful applicants will be notified soon thereafter. 

Further Information:
For further information, please contact Maeva Marcus at (202) 994-6562 or send an email to MMarcus@nyhistory.org.

Additional Information:
There is no tuition or other charge for this seminar, though participants will be expected to acquire the assigned books on their own.

ABOUT ICH

The Institute for Constitutional History (ICH) is the nation’s premier institute dedicated to ensuring that future generations of Americans understand the substance and historical development of the U.S. Constitution. Located at the New-York Historical Society and the George Washington University Law School, the Institute is co-sponsored by the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, and the American Political Science Association. The Association of American Law Schools is a cooperating entity. ICH prepares junior scholars and college instructors to convey to their readers and students the important role the Constitution has played in shaping American society. ICH also provides a national forum for the preparation and dissemination of humanistic, interdisciplinary scholarship on American constitutional history.

About The Stanford Constitutional Law Center 

The Stanford Constitutional Law Center grows out of the long and distinguished tradition of constitutional law scholarship at Stanford Law School. The Center seeks to carry on that tradition by
directing attention to the most fundamental questions of constitutional order, especially the allocation and control of governmental power through law. The Center advances this mission
through events and activities that foster scholarship, generate public discussion, attempt to transcend ideological divides, and provide opportunities for students to engage in analysis of the Constitution.

The Graduate Institute for Constitutional History is supported, in part, by the Saunders Endowment for Constitutional History and a
“We the People” challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

 

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