Museum and Library Closures

The New-York Historical Society will be closed on September 23, and select spaces will be closed September 24. For details, please visit our calendar.

AIDS in New York: The First Five Years examines the AIDS epidemic from 1980 to 1985 and explores the fear and hysteria that followed the AIDS outbreak. The exhibition highlights the power of fear and the frustration felt by those affected by AIDS as well as the steps taken to find...

On October 11, 2013, the New-York Historical Society will celebrate the centennial of this landmark event with The Armory Show at 100, an exhibition of more than ninety masterworks from the 1913 exhibition, including the European avant-garde, icons of American art, and earlier works...

To celebrate the sesquicentennial of the New-York Historical Society’s purchase of the Audubon avian watercolors and the the release of the lavishly illustrated book Audubon’s Aviary: The Original Watercolors for “The Birds of America”―published by the New-York...

Alexander Hamilton: The Man Who Made Modern America (New-York Historical Society, September 10, 2004-February 28, 2005) acquainted visitors with a statesman and visionary whose life inspired discussion and controversy and shaped the America we live in 200 years after his death.
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In 1787, at a time when slavery was crucial to the prosperity and expansion of New York, the New York African Free School was created by the New York Manumission Society, a group dedicated to advocating for African-Americans. The school's explicit mission was to educate black children to take...

Casting a dramatic new light on the events that defined a nation, from the conflicts and rivalries of a fast-growing young republic to the fitful efforts at reconstruction after a terrible Civil War, the New-York Historical Society will present the major exhibition Grant and Lee in War and...

John Rogers (1829-1904) was unquestionably the most popular sculptor of the 19th century, selling over 80,000 narrative figural groups in plaster in his lifetime. More than any other artist of his era, Rogers reached Americans en masse, addressing the issues that shaped their lives and defined...

Abraham Lincoln—the quintessential westerner—owed much of his national political success to his impact on the eastern state of New York—and, in turn, New York's impact on him.This exhibition of original artifacts, iconic images, and hand-written period documents, many in...

The debate over the United States Constitution in New York in 1787–1788 was an extraordinary combination of great political argument and skilled political practice, and it engaged critical issues that are relevant even today.

The statewide public debate culminated in a county-...

Slavery ended in New York State in 1827, yet this victory did not sever the city's connections to enslaved labor. New York City capitalized on the expanding trade in southern cotton and sugar to become the leading American port, a global financial center, and a hotbed of pro-slavery politics.At...

Creative: Tronvig Group