The Day of Battle: World War II in Sicily and Italy

Speaker: 
Rick Atkinson
Sat, June 28th, 2014 | 9:30 am - 11:00 am

EVENT DETAILS

9 am — Registration and Continental Breakfast
9:30 am — Program

John Quincy Adams: American Visionary

Speaker: 
Fred Kaplan
Louis P. Masur (moderator)
Tue, June 10th, 2014 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

A progressive statesman and an outspoken opponent of slavery, many of John Quincy Adams’s beliefs foreshadowed those of Abraham Lincoln and his Republican Party. Unlike Lincoln, however, the sixth President of the United States has been largely overlooked by modern Americans. Drawing on unpublished archival material, biographer Fred Kaplan shines new light on the legacy of this visionary leader.

Neptune: The Allied Invasion of Europe and the D-Day Landings

Speaker: 
Craig L. Symonds
Sat, June 7th, 2014 | 9:30 am - 11:00 am

EVENT DETAILS

9 am — Registration and Continental Breakfast
9:30 am — Program

In the early hours of June 6, 1944, 160,000 Allied troops stormed the beaches of Normandy and began the push to liberate Western Europe from Axis control. One of the greatest naval historians of our time sheds light on the remarkable but little-known naval arm of the invasion—Operation Neptune—the largest seaborne military assault in history.

The Scorpion's Sting: Antislavery and the Coming of the Civil War

Speaker: 
James Oakes
Edna Greene Medford
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Thu, June 5th, 2014 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

Many pre-Civil War antislavery proponents advocated for peaceful abolition: if slave states were surrounded by free states, mass numbers of slaves would be compelled to escape, the Southern economy would be undermined, and voluntary state abolition would be imminent. Experts offer a fresh account of slavery and the Civil War, exploring the idea that a peaceful path to abolition could have been taken.

Around the World with Barry Lewis: Paris

Speaker: 
Barry Lewis
Tue, June 3rd, 2014 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

The French were pioneers of iron and glass construction in the 19th century. By first building shopping gallerias in the early 19th century, then Henri Labrouste’s magnificent iron-framed Saint Genevieve and National Libraries in the mid-century, then the celebrated Eiffel Tower and the Grand Palais at the century’s end, the French showed us how to “love” metallic construction and embrace its new aesthetic.

Great Battles of the Civil War: The Wilderness and Beyond

Speaker: 
James M. McPherson
Craig L. Symonds
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Wed, May 28th, 2014 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

The forests of Virginia literally erupted into flames during the 1864 battles for the Wilderness, as Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee engaged in a horrific combat in early May. Major Civil War historians re-live all the great military struggles of this period—including Sheridan’s Ride, The Crater, and Jubal Early’s Raid on Washington—a season of thrusts and parries, danger and daring.

Clouds of Glory: The Life and Legend of Robert E. Lee

Speaker: 
Michael Korda
Tue, May 27th, 2014 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

A remarkable military leader, Robert E. Lee was a likely candidate to take charge of the Union Army in 1861. However, compelled by a love of his home state of Virginia, this principled man, who disliked slavery and disagreed with secession, pitted himself against an army he served for 36 years. Bestselling author Michael Korda explores this compelling figure, who, as the leading Confederate General, provided the Union with a most fierce adversary.

Great Battles of the Civil War: Fredericksburg

Speaker: 
John F. Marszalek
James M. McPherson
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Wed, May 21st, 2014 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

It was a “slaughter pen,” Robert E. Lee remarked about his repulse of the Union attack on the heights above Fredericksburg, Virginia, in December 1862. Indeed, the Union defeat nearly changed history. Robert E. Lee’s successful defense of Fredericksburg crushed Union morale, humiliated federal commander Ambrose Burnside, almost upended plans for Emancipation—and undoubtedly prolonged the bloody Civil War. Experts on this neglected battle re-imagine its power and impact.

Around the World with Barry Lewis: Central Park

Speaker: 
Barry Lewis
Sun, May 18th, 2014 | 5:00 pm

EVENT DETAILS

Central Park’s design is democracy in three dimensions. No one understood that better than its creators, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. With their talented team, they created a slice of the American countryside—accessible to all—that looks completely natural but is a brilliantly crafted artifice that helps us achieve the “American dream.”

Supreme City: How Jazz Age Manhattan Gave Birth to Modern America

Speaker: 
Donald L. Miller
Tue, May 13th, 2014 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

In the 1920s, an infectious energy filled the air as the country pushed relentlessly into the future, and at the center of it all stood a gleaming city reaching for the sky. Join us for an exploration of the cultural history of Jazz Age Manhattan—from the introduction of “talkies” to the emergence of mass communication to the broadcasting of revolutionary new music on radios—and learn why ambitious innovators of change flocked to the city, transforming America in the process.

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