The Civil War and the American Constitution

Speaker: 
Mark E. Neely, Jr.
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Tue, April 24th, 2012 | 7:30 pm

Event details

The Civil War placed unprecedented — and to this day still unmatched — strain on the U.S. Constitution. Conflicts raged over civil liberties, executive power and the largest questions of nationhood. In this program, two eminent Civil War scholars illuminate how the U.S. Constitution not only survived its greatest test, but emerged stronger after the war, at a time when the nation’s very existence was threatened.

When General Grant Expelled the Jews

Speaker: 
Jonathan Sarna
Rabbi Marc D. Angel (opening remarks)
Wed, April 18th, 2012 | 7:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out

 

Event details

In December 1862, General Ulysses S. Grant issued General Order Number 11, which expelled all Jews from his military district of Kentucky, Tennessee and Mississippi in one of the most blatant incidents of officially sanctioned anti-Semitism in U.S. history. What were the reasons for Grant’s Order? What was its effect and why does this event in Civil War history remain relatively unknown?

The Draft Riots, Part II

Speaker: 
Edna Greene Medford
Carla L. Peterson
Barnet Schecter
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Thu, March 15th, 2012 | 7:30 pm

Event details

In the summer of 1863, in the simmering cauldron of New York City, tensions over the new Union draft law boiled over into a vicious, bloody, racially-motivated riot, the second-largest civil insurrection in American history after the Civil War itself. Experts examine the causes of the conflict, its sickening violence and the enduring legacy it left on New York.

Sherman and the North Advance

Speaker: 
James M. McPherson
John F. Marszalek
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Tue, January 31st, 2012 | 6:30 pm

Event details

Nearly a century and a half after it occurred, Union General William T. Sherman’s epic march from Atlanta to the sea remains one of the most astonishing military feats in American history — as well as one of the most controversial. Generations of Northerners have regarded it as a model of leadership, bravery and resolve. But many Southerners recall it as a brutal desecration of property and honor and judge Sherman as nothing less than a war criminal. What made Sherman march and how important was his triumphant move east in 1864?

Civil War at Sea

Speaker: 
James M. McPherson
Craig L. Symonds
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Tue, December 13th, 2011 | 6:30 pm

Event details

For generations, Civil War military history has focused heavily on the land war, the big battles and on the heroes of the Union and Confederate armies. But the neglected story of the war’s landmark naval engagements, and its great naval heroes, ranks among the most compelling and dramatic in American history. Through both technology and old-fashioned gallantry, on oceans and rivers alike, at places like Hampton Roads, New Orleans, Mobile Bay and even Cherbourg, France, commanders like Farragut, Porter and Semmes changed the course of the war.

American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era

Speaker: 
David W. Blight
Drew Gilpin Faust (moderator)
Thu, November 3rd, 2011 | 7:30 pm

Event details

This program transports us to the 1963 centennial celebration of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation to explore how Americans made sense of the suffering, loss and liberation that had wracked the United States a century earlier. David W. Blight and Drew Gilpin Faust discuss how four of America’s most incisive writers—including Robert Penn Warren, a white southerner who recanted his support for segregation, and James Baldwin, the searing African-American essayist and activist—explored the gulf between remembrance and reality.

A World on Fire: Britain's Crucial Role in the American Civil War

Speaker: 
Amanda Foreman
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Tue, October 4th, 2011 | 7:30 pm

Event details

The American Civil War was the largest non-British conflict ever fought by British men and women. Serving as soldiers, spies and nurses for both the Union and Confederacy, never again would so many risk their lives on behalf of a foreign cause. In this discussion, acclaimed historian Amanda Foreman, in conversation with Harold Holzer, takes the audience on a journey to the drawing rooms of London, the offices of Washington and the front lines of a divided America to examine Great Britain’s integral role in the Civil War.

The First Shot: 1861

Speaker: 
James M. McPherson
Craig L. Symonds
Adam Goodheart
Harold Holzer
Thu, April 7th, 2011 | 7:30 pm

A century and a half after Confederate forces fired on Fort Sumter to ignite the Civil War, leading historians ask and answer the crucial questions: What really caused the conflict? Could the Civil War have been avoided? Did Lincoln invite the first shot—or did the Union “get lucky?” This program marks the start of an ongoing New-York Historical Society focus on the great American tragedy with the first of several discussions and lectures.

The Draft Riots: 1863

Speaker: 
Barnet Schecter
Barry Lewis
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Tue, June 14th, 2011 | 7:30 pm

Event details

Time & Location

Date: Mon, March 21, 2011, 6:30 PM

New York City’s only “Civil War Battle” was the 1863 Draft Riot—a convulsive, racially-motivated street fight for the very soul of Manhattan. Experts provide a frank, no-holds-barred account of the sickening excesses of the bloody struggle, its lasting impact on New York politics, the efforts of the mayor, governor, and President Lincoln himself to quell the frightening disturbance, and what it all meant to the future of New York.

Antietam and the Battles of 1862

Speaker: 
James M. McPherson
Stephen W. Sears
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Thu, May 12th, 2011 | 7:30 pm

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