Museum and Library Closures

The New-York Historical Society will be closed on September 23, and select spaces will be closed September 24. For details, please visit our calendar.

You Were There! Lincoln’s Assassination

Speaker: 
Barry Denenberg
Sun, April 14th, 2013 | 1:30 pm

Be transported to days and months surrounding Abraham Lincoln’s assassination with author Barry Denenberg as he reads from his book Lincoln Shot! What were the initial reports? Who was abetting John Wilkes Booth? Denenberg’s books use a reportage style to bring the events of April 14, 1865 to life, and make them unfold before young readers’ eyes. Barry Denenberg will be available to sign books after the program.
 

The Civil War Draft Riots Walking Tour

Speaker: 
Barnet Schecter
Sat, March 23rd, 2013 | 11:00 am

Note: This event is sold out.

 

EVENT DETAILS

Join historian Barnet Schecter for an in-depth look at the festering racial and class conflicts that produced the deadliest riots in American history: the 1863 Draft Riots. Walking tours are limited to 35 guests per tour. Please buy tickets in advance.

SPEAKER BIO

Barnet Schecter is the author of George Washington’s America: A Biography Through His Maps and The Devil’s Own Work: The Civil War Draft Riots and the Fight to Reconstruct America.

The Civil War in 50 Objects

Speaker: 
Harold Holzer
Eric Foner (moderator)
Mon, May 13th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

From a soldier’s diary with the pencil still attached to John Brown’s pike, the Emancipation Proclamation, a Confederate Palmetto flag, and the leaves from Abraham Lincoln’s bier, Harold Holzer and Eric Foner provide a unique and intimate look at the Civil War through the New- York Historical Society’s renowned collection.

Three Days at Gettysburg, Part II

Speaker: 
James M. McPherson
John F. Marszalek
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Wed, May 8th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out

 

EVENT DETAILS

In July 1863, Union and Confederate troops met in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania and in three days forever changed the course of American history. Three of America’s most renowned Civil War historians discuss one of the bloodiest and most haunting battles of the American Civil War.

Seward: Lincoln’s Indispensable Man

Speaker: 
Walter Stahr
Louis P. Masur (moderator)
Tue, March 19th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out

 

EVENT DETAILS

William Henry Seward was one of the most important Americans of the nineteenth century: progressive governor of New York, outspoken federal senator, secretary of state during the Civil War and its aftermath, and a target of the assassins who killed Lincoln. Join us for an illuminating conversation about a complex and pivotal figure, Lincoln’s closest friend and adviser, and an early architect of America’s empire.

Screening and Discussion of Lincoln with Tony Kushner and Harold Holzer

Speaker: 
Tony Kushner
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Tue, January 29th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

Celebrating the release of Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln, the New-York Historical Society presents a screening of this monumental film followed by a conversation with screenwriter and playwright Tony Kushner and Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day: Celebrate the Emancipation Proclamation with author Tonya Bolden

Mon, January 21st, 2013 | 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Celebrate the 150th anniversary of this essential part of American history with a special reading from Author Tonya Bolden! Hear Tonya, author of Maritcha: A Nineteenth-Century American Girl, read from her new children’s book Emancipation Proclamation: Lincoln and the Dawn of Liberty. Tonya will also be doing a Q&A, and signing copies of her book.

The Thirteenth Amendment

Feb 1 2012 - Apr 30 2012

In honor of Black History Month and Abraham Lincoln's birthday, the New-York Historical Society is proud to display a rare handwritten copy of the Thirteenth Amendment—signed by Lincoln himself—in our Robert H. and Clarice Smith New York Gallery of American History.  The document, which was recently acquired by David Rubenstein, managing director of The Carlyle Group, is on loan to the New-York Historical Society through April 1.

Abraham Lincoln. Manuscript Document Signed (“Abraham Lincoln”) as President, with his Autograph Endorsement (“Approved. February 1, 1865.”) Washington, DC, ca. February 1, 1865. Co-signed by Hannibal Hamlin as Vice President of the United States and President of the Senate, Schuyler Colfax as Speaker of the House, and John W. Forney as Secretary of the Senate. 1 p., 15 1/16 x 20 in., on lined vellum with ruled borders.

One of about thirteen manuscripts Lincoln signed in addition to the original, this copy belonged to Schuyler Colfax, House Speaker in 1863 and later Vice President under Ulysses S. Grant. According to Seth Kaller, president of Seth Kaller, Inc., who acquired the document for Mr. Rubenstein in a private transaction, and arranged its loan to New-York Historical, “this is the one that is directly traceable to a leader instrumental in the amendment’s passage. It has not been displayed in New York for more than forty years."

The Draft Riots, Part II

Speaker: 
Edna Greene Medford
Carla L. Peterson
Barnet Schecter
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Thu, March 15th, 2012 | 7:30 pm

Event details

In the summer of 1863, in the simmering cauldron of New York City, tensions over the new Union draft law boiled over into a vicious, bloody, racially-motivated riot, the second-largest civil insurrection in American history after the Civil War itself. Experts examine the causes of the conflict, its sickening violence and the enduring legacy it left on New York.

American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era

Speaker: 
David W. Blight
Drew Gilpin Faust (moderator)
Thu, November 3rd, 2011 | 7:30 pm

Event details

This program transports us to the 1963 centennial celebration of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation to explore how Americans made sense of the suffering, loss and liberation that had wracked the United States a century earlier. David W. Blight and Drew Gilpin Faust discuss how four of America’s most incisive writers—including Robert Penn Warren, a white southerner who recanted his support for segregation, and James Baldwin, the searing African-American essayist and activist—explored the gulf between remembrance and reality.

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