How To Survive A Plague

Speaker: 
David France
Tue, 09/03/2013 - 19:00
Tue, September 3rd, 2013 | 7:00 pm

Event Details

Faced with their own mortality, an improbable group of young people—many of them HIV-positive young men—broke the mold as radical activists taking on Washington and the medical establishment. Join filmmaker David France and the New-York Historical Society for a free screening of the Academy Award-nominated documentary HOW TO SURVIVE A PLAGUE.

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Ending the Epidemic: Science Advances on AIDS

Fri, 05/31/2013 - 10:00
Fri, May 31st, 2013 | 10:00 am

Event Details

Join a stellar panel as we examine the past, present, and future of the AIDS epidemic. With the rate of HIV infection on the rise once more in New York, it’s a critical time to explore the past missteps and victories in the battle against HIV and AIDS. We’ll also look ahead to the future and evaluate the most promising opportunities for breakthroughs.

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Children With AIDS: Spirit and Memory. Photographs by Claire Yaffa

June 07, 2013
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September 01, 2013

To accompany AIDS in New York: The First Five Years, the New-York Historical Society will curate a visual arts exhibition and gallery show, featuring twenty breathtaking black and white photographs by noted photographer and social realist Claire Yaffa from her collection “The Changing Face of Children with AIDS.”

Claire Yaffa, Anthony, ca. 1990-1992Gelatin silver print. New-York Historical Society, Gift of the photographer

Claire Yaffa, whose work has been featured in The New York Times and several other major publications, has worked for years to document an intensely intimate, behind-the-scenes look at medical institutions and their youngest patients, giving agency and voice to thousands of
individuals—particularly children—struggling with life-threatening illnesses. Among the institutions that Yaffa has worked with during her long artistic career, the Incarnation Children’s Center in the Bronx—an organization that was one of the first to care for orphaned infants born with HIV—provided some of Yaffa’s most visceral subject matter, offering a stirring tribute to those affected by HIV/AIDS. Beginning in 1990, Yaffa visited Incarnation Children’s Center and was permitted to document the lives of these afflicted children and adolescents over a period of ten years, creating haunting portraits that capture the pathos and beauty of dozens of HIV’s youngest victims—most of whom did not survive to adulthood—and documenting the extraordinary devotion of the children’s caretakers.

The exhibition will have a special focus on two or three individual children’s stories and will featuring several of Yaffa’s emotionally moving, mid- to large-format, black and white photographs, and revealing with clarity and humility the often heartbreaking tales of children afflicted with HIV and AIDS.

AIDS in New York: The First Five Years Gallery Tour

Speaker: 
Jean Ashton
Mon, 06/10/2013 - 11:00
Mon, June 10th, 2013 | 11:00 am

EVENT DETAILS

Jean Ashton leads a gallery tour exploring the impact of the AIDS epidemic on personal lives, public health and medical practices, culture, and politics in New York City and the nation. Gallery tours are limited to 35 guests per tour. Please buy tickets in advance.

SPEAKER BIO

Jean Ashton is Senior Director, Resources and Programs at the New-York Historical Society and curator of AIDS in New York: The First Five Years.

Price: 
$30
Members price: 
$18
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Larry Kramer and The Normal Heart

Speaker: 
Larry Kramer
Tony Kushner (moderator)
Wed, 06/26/2013 - 18:30
Wed, June 26th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

EVENT DETAILS

Debuting in 1985, Larry Kramer’s award-winning play The Normal Heart encapsulated the fear, confusion, and outrage of the early years of the HIV/ AIDS crisis in New York City. In conjunction with the exhibition AIDS in New York: The First Five Years, this special program reflects on this critical period and the play’s lasting significance.

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AIDS in New York: The First Five Years

June 07, 2013
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September 15, 2013

For those who lost partners, children, siblings, parents, and friends to HIV/AIDS in the later years of the twentieth century, the memory of grief, fear, and mystery which pervaded New York at the beginning of the epidemic remains vivid. But for many New Yorkers and others today, this early period from 1981 to 1985 is virtually unknown. The activist movements that changed the nation’s approach to catastrophic disease have overshadowed the panic of this period when a new and fatal enemy to public health was in its earliest stages and no one knew how to combat it.

A group advocating AIDS research marches down Fifth Avenue during the 14th annual Lesbian and Gay Pride parade in New York, June 27, 1983. Mario Suriani/Associated Press

AIDS in New York: The First Five Years will explore the impact of the epidemic on personal lives, public health and medical practices, culture, and politics in New York City and the nation. Drawing from the archives of the New York Public Library, New York University, and the National Archive of LGBT History, the show will use posters, photographs, and artifacts to tell the story of the early years of AIDS in New York.

 

Generous support for this exhibition and its related educational programming has been provided, in part, by Ford Foundation, The New York Community Trust, and the Keith Haring Foundation.
 

The Pop Shop: Education

September 18, 2012
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January 13, 2013

In honor of the installation of the ceiling from Keith Haring’s famous Pop Shop above the new admissions area in the Robert H. and Clarice Smith New York Gallery of American History, the New-York Historical Society, in collaboration with the Keith Haring Foundation, has created a rotating display devoted to the Pop Shop in the Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture. The ceiling is a gift from the Haring Foundation, and all items in the Luce Center display are on loan from Foundation.

Keith Haring, Fill Your Head with Fun! Start Reading! Poster. 1988. Keith Haring artwork © Keith Haring Foundation

The latest of these displays to be installed, on view from September 18, 2012 through January 13, 2013, reflects on Keith Haring’s contributions to education, in particular his work in encouraging young people to read. On view will be posters, drawings and T-shirt designs by Haring, photographs by Adam Scull and Tseng Kwong Chi documenting the official launch of a Haring-designed campaign of public service advertisements, newspaper articles, a television interview with Haring, and one of the artist’s journals.

In 1986, with the encouragement of his friend and mentor Andy Warhol (1928–1987), internationally known New York artist Keith Haring (1958–1990) caused controversy by opening the Pop Shop in downtown Manhattan. Among Haring’s, and the Pop Shop’s, biggest fans were children: “There is nothing that makes me happier than making a child smile,” noted Haring in a 1988 journal entry. “The reason the “baby” has become my logo or signature is that it is the purest and most positive experience of human existence.” Throughout the 1980s Haring offered his services for education projects. In 1985 he created the poster for New York is Book Country, the famous annual book fair held on Fifth Avenue in support of the Children’s Services Division of the New York Public Library. Many of the best-known children’s authors including Charles Schulz, Maurice Sendak, and William Steig also donated their artwork for fair posters over the years—even as a fine artist, Haring’s work naturally paralleled theirs.

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