Lost Arts Series: Scrimshaw

Sun, March 30th, 2014 | 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Ages 6+ and adults
Tickets include the price of Museum Admission

A whaler's life was never easy in the 18th or 19th centuries. Come learn the history behind the unique art form of scrimshaw, painstakingly practiced by men on long, seafaring voyages. See examples of scrimshaw, images carved into the bones of whales and other arctic creatures, and then create your own version in the studio.

Tickets are $15 per person ($12 for members) and include the price of Museum admission. Adults must accompany their children to the programs. For ages 6+.

The Coast & the Sea: Marine and Maritime Art in America

The New-York Historical Society holds an important collection of marine paintings and maritime artifacts; a reflection of the fact that the early history and culture of the United States are closely bound to the Atlantic and the eastern seaboard of North America. More than fifty paintings ranging in date from 1750 to 1904 and a medley of maritime artifacts have been selected for The Coast & the Sea: Marine and Maritime Art in America, offering audiences a rich trove of maritime works set in a meaningful historical and cultural narrative.

Thomas Birch (1779-1851), Escape of the U.S. Frigate Constitution, 1838, oil on canvas. Bequest of Matilda Wolfe Bruce, 1908.5

 Tour Schedule

Venue Dates
The Baker Museum (Naples, FL) April 19–July 6, 2014
Portland Museum of Art (Portland, ME) January-May 2015
Mattatuck Museum (Waterbury, CT)

Children’s Concert: Ship of Tolerance

Fri, September 27th, 2013 | 7:00 pm

Note: This program is sold out

Come hear classically trained young musicians from around the world in this unique children's concert, part of the Ship of Tolerance weekend of activities. This organization promotes communication and connections between the children of the world, with the greater goal of tolerance and understanding.

Seating is limited. Please RSVP to familyprograms@nyhistory.org

Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion

Sep 26 2014 - Apr 19 2015

Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion explores the centuries-long history of trade and immigration between China and the United States—a history that involved New York from its very beginnings—and will raise the question “What does it mean to be an American?” The exhibit narrative extends from the late eighteenth century to the present and includes all regions of the country, thus interpreting the Chinese American saga as a key part of American history.

Arnold Genthe, Woman and Child, San Francisco Chinatown. Photograph. New-York Historical Society

Within the exhibition, rich in media and artifacts, will be little-known stories, such as the voyage of the Empress of China, which set sail from New York in the late eighteenth century; how young Chinese boys were sent by their government to study at elite New England schools during the nineteenth century; the unprecedented immigration legislation known as the Exclusion Act of 1882, which barred most Chinese from entering the United States; the nineteenth-century newspaper, called Chinese American, and its founder Wong Chin Foo; and the Chinese America

Pacific War Turning Point: Midway or Guadalcanal?

Speaker: 
Richard B. Frank
Craig L. Symonds
Sat, June 8th, 2013 | 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

EVENT DETAILS

9 am — Registration and Continental Breakfast

Program includes two brief lectures followed by a discussion.

WWII & NYC

The Second World War (1939–1945) was the most widespread, destructive, and consequential conflict in history. WWII & NYC is an account of how New York and its metropolitan region contributed to Allied victory. The exhibition also explores the captivating, sobering, and moving stories of how New Yorkers experienced and confronted the challenges of “total war.”

When war broke out in 1939, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the global conflict and strongly held opinions about whether or not to intervene. The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the U.S. into the war, and New York became the principal port of embarkation for the warfront. The presence of troops, the inflow of refugees, the wartime industries, the dispatch of fleets, and the dissemination of news and propaganda from media outlets, changed New York, giving its customary commercial and creative bustle a military flavor.

WWII & NYC

Oct 5 2012 - May 27 2013

The Second World War (1939–1945) was the most widespread, destructive, and consequential conflict in history. WWII & NYC is an account of how New York and its metropolitan region contributed to Allied victory. The exhibition also explores the captivating, sobering, and moving stories of how New Yorkers experienced and confronted the challenges of “total war.”
Want to see everything—from lectures to films to behind-the-scenes stories—related to WWII & NYC? Click here to visit the WWII & NYC site!

Irving Boyer, Prospect Park, ca. 1942–1944. Oil on academy board. The New-York Historical Society, Gift of Selwyn L. Boyer, from the Boyer Family Collection, 2002.49

When war broke out in 1939, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the global conflict and strongly held opinions about whether or not to intervene. The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the U.S. into the war, and New York became the principal port of embarkation for the warfront.

Syndicate content
Creative: Tronvig Group