Macy's Sunday Story Time: Christmas Wishes

Sun, December 22nd, 2013 | 11:30 am

Recommended for children ages 3–7. 

The Carpenter's Gift: A Christmas Tale about the Rockefeller Center Tree by David Rubel

Thanks to a group of carpenters working during the Great Depression, Henry’s Christmas wish to live in a nice, warm house may come true. Join us to find out and learn how a Rockefeller Center tradition makes this wish come true for families today.

From the seventeenth century to the twenty-first, through fiction and through fact, hear tales of NYC and the people who made it great.

It’s a Wonderful Life (1946)

Speaker: 
Mary Owen
Bob Herbert
Fri, December 6th, 2013 | 7:00 pm

TICKETS

Entrance to the film series is included with Museum Admission during New-York Historical’s Pay-as-you-wish Friday Nights (6 – 8 pm). No advanced reservations. Tickets are distributed on a first-come, first-served basis beginning at 6 pm. New-York Historical Society members receive priority.

Holiday Express: Toys and Trains from the Jerni Collection

Nov 23 2012 - Sep 8 2013

Magnificent model trains, train stations and sheds, bridges and tunnels, carousels and Ferris wheels—all populated with toy figurines in colorful nineteenth-century dress, will be on view this holiday season at the New-York Historical Society, in the first museum exhibition of selections from the renowned Jerni Collection.

Marklin Elevated Station with accessories, ca. 1900. From the Collection of Jerry and Nina Greene.

Among the unique, hand-crafted and hand-painted toys will be the only existing first model elevated station. Designed by Märklin, ca. 1895, it is known as the Rolls-Royce of toy train manufacturers and will be displayed in the Judith and Howard Berkowitz Sculpture Court, near the 77th Street entrance. In New-York Historical’s Luce Center, the installation will include Märklin’s largest and most elaborate train station, ca. 1904; Marklin’s only known extant post office, ca. 1895; a Märklin girder bridge designed by Gustave Eiffel, ca.

Saint Nicholas

Title
Saint Nicholas
Date 
1837-1838
Credit Line 
New-York Historical Society, Gift of Mr. George A. Zabriskie
Object Number 
1951.76
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Religious and Charitable Organization Collections

Teaser: 

One of the great, and growing, strengths of the department’s collections is records of churches, benevolent societies, educational groups, and art unions that have reached out to New York’s neediest populations and fostered the cultural life of the city over many generations. Within the scope of these organizations are the New York Mariner’s Church, Broadway Tabernacle Church and Society, the Ladies’ Christian Union, the New York Manumission Society, the Colored Orphan Asylum, the Society for the Relief of Poor Widows, the Children’s Aid Society, the New York Foundling Hospital, the Leake & Watts Children’s Home, the Traveler’s Aid Society of New York, the Emergency Shelter, the New-York African Free School, the Public School Society, the Southern Famine Relief Commission, the Artists’ Fund Society, and the American Art Union.

Weight: 
3

Dining Menus

Teaser: 

The Klingenstein Library’s extensive collection of American dining menus—largely amassed by Chicago restaurateur Arnold Shircliffe (1880–1952) and donated to the New-York Historical Society in 1954—includes approximately 10,000 examples from honoree dinners, associational banquets, historical anniversaries, holidays, hotels, restaurants, ships, trains and planes. Descriptive information is available for each menu via an on-site database.

Weight: 
5

It Happened Here: The Invention of Santa Claus

Nov 25 2011 - Jan 8 2012

Though legend has it that Santa Claus hails from the North Pole, he was actually a New Yorker who came into the world on West 23rd Street in what is now the trendy Chelsea neighborhood.

Thomas Nast and George Webster. Santa Claus and his works. New York: McLoughlin Bros., ca 1870. New-York Historical Society, YC1870.Web.

The modern Santa was born in the imagination of Clement Clarke Moore, a scholar who penned a whimsical poem about St. Nicholas, the patron of old Dutch New York, for the amusement of his six children at Christmastime. Soon after the publication of "A Visit from St. Nicholas"—popularly known today by its opening line, "Twas the night before Christmas…""—St. Nicholas became a popular feature of American Christmas celebrations. Moore's poem permanently connected St. Nicholas to Christmas, and led to our idea of Santa Claus.

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