The Civil War Draft Riots Walking Tour 1

Speaker: 
Barnet Schecter
Sat, 04/02/2011 - 11:00
Sat, April 2nd, 2011 | 12:00 pm

In July 1863, several months after President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation and signed the nation's first federal draft law, New York City was nearly destroyed in a four-day cataclysm of arson, looting, and lynching. Join historian Barnet Schecter for an in-depth look at the festering racial and class conflicts that produced the deadliest riots in American history.

Price: 
$20
Members price: 
$10
Buy Tickets URL: 
www.smarttix.com
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Lincoln and New York

October 09, 2009
-
March 25, 2010

Abraham Lincoln—the quintessential westerner—owed much of his national political success to his impact on the eastern state of New York—and, in turn, New York’s impact on him.

The Lincoln Family, ca. 1865, Francis Bicknell Carpenter, 1830-1900, Oil on canvas, Gift of Warren C. Crane, 1909.6

Click here to visit the exhibition website

This exhibition of original artifacts, iconic images and hand-written period documents, many in Lincoln's own hand, will for the first time fully trace the evolution of Lincoln's relationship with the nation's largest and wealthiest state: from the time of his triumphant Cooper Union address here in 1860, to his efforts to hold the Union together in 1861, to the early challenges of recruitment and investment in the Civil War, to the development of new military technologies and the challenge to civil liberties in time of rebellion. Lincoln's evolving stance on slavery issues alternately pleased and infuriated New Yorkers. African-Americans, many of them veterans of the anti-slavery movement and Underground Railroad activism, saw Lincoln as slow to deal with the numerous slaves escaping during the war. These "contraband" forces clamored to join the Union army which for several years excluded colored troops—be they free men or the newly freed. Meanwhile free black New Yorkers readied volunteer regiments.

New York's role as the Union's prime provider of manpower, treasure, media coverage, image-making and protest, some of it racist—the 1863 Draft Riots and the robust effort to unseat Lincoln in 1864—will be traced alongside Lincoln's concurrent growth as a leader, writer, symbol of Union and freedom, and ultimately as national martyr. This show will demonstrate how through all, from political parades to funeral processions, New York played a surprisingly central role in the Lincoln story—and how Lincoln became a leading player in the life of New York. This exhibition commemorates the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial. A catalog will accompany the exhibition.

Lead Sponsor:

This exhibition has been developed with grant funds from the
U.S. Department of Education
Underground Railroad Educational and Cultural (URR) Program

Additional project support has been provided by The Bodman Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities

The Draft Riots: 1863

Speaker: 
Barnet Schecter
Barry Lewis
Harold Holzer (moderator)
Tue, 06/14/2011 - 18:30
Tue, June 14th, 2011 | 7:30 pm

Event details

Time & Location

Date: Mon, March 21, 2011, 6:30 PM

New York City’s only “Civil War Battle” was the 1863 Draft Riot—a convulsive, racially-motivated street fight for the very soul of Manhattan. Experts provide a frank, no-holds-barred account of the sickening excesses of the bloody struggle, its lasting impact on New York politics, the efforts of the mayor, governor, and President Lincoln himself to quell the frightening disturbance, and what it all meant to the future of New York.

Price: 
$20
Members price: 
$10
Buy Tickets URL: 
http://www.smarttix.com/show.aspx?showcode=dra312&ss=1
Sold out: 
0

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