United States 1933 Double Eagle

On display is one of the most famous and storied coins in the world—the 1933 Double Eagle. The Double Eagle is on display in The Robert H. & Clarice Smith New York Gallery of American History. Designed by the renowned sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens, the coin features the figure of Liberty striding before the Capitol Building on its face and an eagle in flight on the reverse.

In 1933 the United States struck almost a half million twenty-dollar gold coins, commonly known as Double Eagles. At virtually the same time, in one of his first acts as President, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an Executive Order banning the payout of gold, weaning the country off the gold standard. The 1933 Double Eagles, although legally made, became illegal to own and were never circulated. In 1934, two were sent to the Smithsonian Institution for posterity, and in February 1937 the rest were melted into gold bars and sent to Fort Knox—or so it seemed.

In 1944, a 1933 Double Eagle appeared in a New York auction, and the United States Secret Service determined that a U.S. Mint employee had stolen a number of the coins in 1937, and identified ten 1933 Double Eagles that had escaped destruction, of which nine were surrendered or seized. One was beyond reach, as it had been purchased by King Farouk of Egypt, and after 1954 it disappeared. In 1996 a British coin dealer was arrested while trying to sell a 1933 Double Eagle, which he swore had formerly belonged to King Farouk.

In 2002, the coin was sold at auction for $7,590,020, nearly doubling the previous world record. That very coin—the only 1933 Double Eagle which may be legally owned by an individual—will be on display at New-York Historical, on temporary loan from an anonymous private collection.

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)

Speaker: 
Ted Widmer
Fri, 06/14/2013 - 19:00
Fri, June 14th, 2013 | 7:00 pm

TICKETS

Admission to the film programs is free in conjunction with New-York Historical’s Pay-as-you-wish Friday Nights (6-8 PM). No advanced reservations are possible for these events. Tickets are distributed on a first-come, first-served basis beginning at 6 PM. Auditorium doors open at 6:30 PM (unless otherwise noted).

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World War II and New York: Walking Tour of Lower Manhattan

Speaker: 
Cal Snyder
Lucy Oakley
Sun, 06/02/2013 - 11:00
Sun, June 2nd, 2013 | 11:00 am

Note: This event is sold out

 

EVENT DETAILS

From Battery Park to the Army Ocean Terminal, New York Harbor vividly records the city’s role in WWII. Join us to hear the story of the harbor and its people in wartime and explore how New York City remembers those who fought to protect the free world. Walking tours are limited to 35 guests per tour. Please buy tickets in advance.

Price: 
$30
Members price: 
$18
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Pacific War Turning Point: Midway or Guadalcanal?

Speaker: 
Richard B. Frank
Craig L. Symonds
Sat, 06/08/2013 - 09:00 to 12:00
Sat, June 8th, 2013 | 9:00 am to 12:00 pm

EVENT DETAILS

9 am — Registration and Continental Breakfast

Program includes two brief lectures followed by a discussion.

Price: 
$60
Members price: 
$36
Buy Tickets URL: 
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The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe

Speaker: 
Rick Atkinson
Steve Coll (moderator)
Tue, 05/21/2013 - 18:30
Tue, May 21st, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out

 

EVENT DETAILS

D-Day marked the commencement of the final campaign of the European war. Two authors tell the tale of the riveting series of events from the brutal fight in Normandy, the liberation of Paris, the disaster that was Operation Market Garden, the horrific Battle of the Bulge, and finally the thrust to the heart of the Third Reich.

Price: 
$30
Members price: 
$18
Buy Tickets URL: 
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Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America’s Fight Over World War II

Speaker: 
Lynne Olson
Tom Brokaw (moderator)
Thu, 03/28/2013 - 18:30
Thu, March 28th, 2013 | 6:30 pm

Note: This event is sold out.

 

EVENT DETAILS

At the center of the debate over American intervention in World War II were the two most famous men in America: President Franklin D. Roosevelt and aviator Charles Lindbergh. The stakes could not have been higher; the combatants were larger than life. Join us for a frank discussion of the bitter clash that divided the nation, with the future of democracy and the fate of the free world hanging in the balance.

Price: 
$30
Members price: 
$18
Buy Tickets URL: 
node/103708
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WWII & NYC

October 23, 2012
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October 23, 2012

The Second World War (1939–1945) was the most widespread, destructive, and consequential conflict in history. WWII & NYC is an account of how New York and its metropolitan region contributed to Allied victory. The exhibition also explores the captivating, sobering, and moving stories of how New Yorkers experienced and confronted the challenges of “total war.”

When war broke out in 1939, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the global conflict and strongly held opinions about whether or not to intervene. The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the U.S. into the war, and New York became the principal port of embarkation for the warfront. The presence of troops, the inflow of refugees, the wartime industries, the dispatch of fleets, and the dissemination of news and propaganda from media outlets, changed New York, giving its customary commercial and creative bustle a military flavor. Likewise, the landscape of the city acquired a martial air, as defenses in the harbor were bolstered, old forts were updated, and the docks became high security zones.

 

WWII & NYC

October 05, 2012
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May 27, 2013

The Second World War (1939–1945) was the most widespread, destructive, and consequential conflict in history. WWII & NYC is an account of how New York and its metropolitan region contributed to Allied victory. The exhibition also explores the captivating, sobering, and moving stories of how New Yorkers experienced and confronted the challenges of “total war.”
Want to see everything—from lectures to films to behind-the-scenes stories—related to WWII & NYC? Click here to visit the WWII & NYC site!

Irving Boyer, Prospect Park, ca. 1942–1944. Oil on academy board. The New-York Historical Society, Gift of Selwyn L. Boyer, from the Boyer Family Collection, 2002.49

When war broke out in 1939, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the global conflict and strongly held opinions about whether or not to intervene. The attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 brought the U.S. into the war, and New York became the principal port of embarkation for the warfront. The presence of troops, the inflow of refugees, the wartime industries, the dispatch of fleets, and the dissemination of news and propaganda from media outlets, changed New York, giving its customary commercial and creative bustle a military flavor. Likewise, the landscape of the city acquired a martial air, as defenses in the harbor were bolstered, old forts were updated, and the docks became high security zones.

The exhibition examines the experiences of New Yorkers on the home front and those who served. In New York City, workers mobilized to assist in wartime production, from shipbuilding at the Brooklyn Navy Yard to uniform manufacturing at Brooks Brothers. Families grew victory gardens and dealt with the challenges of rationing. Military training camps sprang up throughout the city, and nightclubs and theaters opened their doors to the droves of servicemen passing through. Each day in the crowded port a logistical miracle occurred. Sixty-three million tons of supplies and 3,300,000 men shipped out from New York Harbor—at war’s height, a ship left every 15 minutes. 900,000 New Yorkers served in the military; twelve of their stories are told through individual profiles, and in a 20-minute film shot by a Signal Corps combat cameraman trained in Queens.

Installed throughout all floors of the New-York Historical Society, the exhibition features more than 400 images and objects, including artifacts, paintings, maps, photographs, posters, music, radio broadcasts, and thirteen short films made for the exhibit, many featuring interviews with actual participants. The exhibition draws upon extensive collections at the New-York Historical Society and on important loans from the US Navy, the Museum of WWII, Boston, the Smithsonian Institution, the Mariners’ Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, among other institutions.

West Gallery

War for Civil Rights describes a “Double V” campaign waged by African Americans during WWII, which argued that the black men and women who fought for victory abroad deserved full civil rights and victory over racism at home. The exhibit, comprised of photographs, posters, and two new short films, focuses on three aspects of the Double V campaign in New York City: the Negro Freedom Rallies; the fight against Red Cross blood segregation; and the effort to integrate the Stuyvesant Town housing development.

Cabinet Gallery

GI Sketch Diary: Ben Brown’s World War II Drawings features the artwork of Bronx-raised Ben Brown, a corporal who fought in North Africa and in the bitter and bloody Italian campaign. Brown carried sketchbooks with him throughout his time on the front. The sketches seen in this exhibit—a fraction of the art Brown produced during the war— illustrates his experiences and the people and places he encountered.

Robert H. and Clarice Smith New York Gallery of American History

Several World War II-related displays can be found in The Robert H. and Clarice Smith New York Gallery of American History. Small objects from the home front, including jewelry, matchbooks, and games, are on view in cases embedded in the floor. Six video columns feature a slideshow of images, including battlefront photographs, recruitment posters, patriotic textiles, among others. And the monumental History Showcase exhibit displays wartime uniforms and related posters.

Lowlight Gallery

Visualizing Liberty and Democracy: The Four Freedoms, December 14, 2012 through January 1, 2013. Almost a year before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that propelled the United States into World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed Congress in a State of the Union speech. The president spoke of threatened international security and articulated the hope for a new world order founded upon four essential human freedoms: the freedom of speech and expression; the freedom of worship; the freedom from want; and the freedom from fear. The Four Freedoms, as they immediately came to be known, provided a facile explanation to Americans about their country’s ultimate participation in the war. Yet by 1942, only one-third of the public was familiar with what they were. Unable to serve his country in other ways, the artist Norman Rockwell became driven to illustrate Roosevelt’s vision. The Manhattan-born, Vermont transplant specialized in commercially popular, sentimental scenes of small-town life, and his four paintings of each “freedom” were no exception. Rockwell’s series succeeded in making the American public visualize Roosevelt’s lofty rhetoric, and helped them to understand what the world was fighting for. Today, The Four Freedoms endure as four of Norman Rockwell’s most iconic works, and also offer a lesson in World War II ideology and propaganda.

Luce Center

A display in the Luce Center highlights the role of the New-York Historical Society during WWII. The exhibit includes information and objects from staff members who went to war; ephemera and photographs from wartime exhibitions; acquisitions collected during and after the war; and insight into the changes made throughout the museum to adapt to the war.

 

WWII & NYC was made possible, in part, by:

Bernard & Irene Schwartz
The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation
May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc.
Eric & Fiona Rudin
Jack & Susan Rudin
Elizabeth B. Dater & Wm. Mitchell Jennings, Jr.
Ruth & Harold Newman
Ernest Tollerson
Laurie & Sy Sternberg
Charles Rosenblum
The Weiler Family

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department
of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The New-York Historical Society is grateful to New York City Councilmember
Gale A. Brewer for her support.

Support for the exhibition publication was generously provided by
Futhermore: a program of the J.M. Kaplan Fund

Media Sponsor:


FDR’s Brain Trust and the Beginning of the New Deal

November 06, 2009
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March 26, 2010

In his search for a new national message during the 1932 presidential primary, FDR gathered around him a number of political, economic and legal scholars. The core of this group were Columbia University professors, who knew and trusted each other, and were willing to take risks and work long unpaid hours to promote a candidate that they believed could turn around a nation in crisis.

Irving Browning Buy My Apples, 1929 Gelatin Silver Print New-York Historical Society, Gift of Irving Browning.

Although at first a casual circle, the group became tightly organized after FDR's nomination. After the election, they were publicly christened the "Brain Trust," and became the central component of the New Deal. This exhibition will focus on the three key members of the Brain Trust—Raymond Moley, Rexford Tugwell, and Adolph Berle—and two of the New Deal cabinet members with whom they worked to bring about FDR's radical changes—Frances Perkins and Harry Hopkins. Using contemporary photographs, cartoons, broadsides, articles and newsreels, this exhibition will be supplemented by audio reminisces from the collection of the Columbia University Oral History Research Office.

 

Franklin, Eleanor, and the Four Freedoms

Speaker: 
William E. Leuchtenburg
William J. vanden Heuvel
Douglas Brinkley (Moderator)
Thu, 03/31/2011 - 18:30
Thu, March 31st, 2011 | 7:30 pm

In his State of the Union Address on January 6, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt looked forward to a world in which everyone enjoyed four essential freedoms: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. These values were central to both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, who made it her personal mission to codify those rights in the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Experts discuss the speech and its far-reaching influence, and also delve into this extraordinary couple’s influence on one another.

Price: 
$20
Members price: 
$10
Buy Tickets URL: 
http://www.smarttix.com/searchresults.aspx?type=name&keyword=Franklin,%20Eleanor,%20and%20the%20Four%20Freedoms&GUID=fd5a8baa-32ff-4507-ba4f-6e4ab8bddef1
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