George Washington’s New York: Walking Tour of Lower Manhattan 1

Speaker: 
Barnet Schecter
Sat, 10/01/2011 - 11:00
Sat, October 1st, 2011 | 12:00 pm

Note: This event is sold out.

 

Price: 
$24
Members price: 
$12
Buy Tickets URL: 
http://www.nyhistory.org/node/62890
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The Luce Center

The Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture on our fourth floor will be closed for renovations through December 2016. Please check back in the fall for details of our exciting new galleries and installations.
 
The Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture on the fourth floor provides public access to nearly 40,000 objects from the New-York Historical Society’s permanent collection. In the Luce Center, visitors can see art and artifacts spanning four centuries, ranging from masterworks of American painting, to the nation’s premiere collection of Tiffany lamps, to historical touchstones such as the draft wheel that played a role in one of the worst urban riots in United States history. 

The Luce Center houses collections formerly kept in offsite storage. It offers a behind-the-scenes look at a working museum collection. In addition to a rich array of objects, small focus exhibitions highlight specific strengths of the collection and offer a historical context for current cultural, economic, political and social issues. Free handheld guides and cell phone tours allow visitors to hear the stories behind the objects on view.

George Washington’s New York: Walking Tour of Lower Manhattan

Speaker: 
Barnet Schecter
Sun, 11/14/2010 - 11:00
Sun, November 14th, 2010 | 11:00 am

Among the maps that George Washington owned was British military engineer John Montresor's A Plan of the City of New-York, surveyed in 1766. The map provided Washington with detailed information about the streets and hills of Lower Manhattan as he fortified the city against a British assault in 1776. The map was also useful for planning Washington's triumphant entry into New York on November 25, 1783 as the British ended their 70- year occupation and evacuated the city.

Price: 
$20
Members price: 
$10
Buy Tickets URL: 
www.smarttix.com
Sold out: 
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Byrdcliffe: An American Arts And Crafts Colony

March 05, 2005
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May 15, 2005

An exhibition that honors one of the most influential arts colonies in the United States is on view at the New-York Historical Society from March 15- May 15, 2005. Produced by the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University, the exhibition tells the story about this remarkable community that was founded in 1902 and still operates today.

Byrdcliffe is located in Woodstock, NY; a town known for its impact on social change through art, music and non-violent measures. Set against the background of a rapidly changing America, the exhibit concentrates on the arts and crafts created at Byrdcliffe from the colony's earliest days, until the death of co-founder and chief investor Ralph Whitehead in 1929. The colony drew especially large crowds for its 'Maverick' music festivals which were filled uninhibited, bohemian song and dance. Folk icon Bob Dylan continued the music tradition many years later at Byrdcliffe when he and The Band lived and recorded the famous Basement Tapes at a neighboring house in Saugerties.

The exhibit features a total of 191 paintings, photographs, prints, frames, metalwork, furniture, ceramics and textiles from nearly two dozen artists who called Byrdcliffe home. Of equal importance as the art itself, were the utopian ideals advanced by Whitehead and the other founders, combined with the dynamic creativity of its talented but under-appreciated artists.

The exhibit and companion catalog, which is available in the N-YHS Museum Store, examines the historical, artistic and social significance of the colony through three interconnected themes: Quest for the Handmade shows how the work of the artists, writers and critics reflects a rebellion against the technological advances of the Industrial Revolution; Byrdcliffe as a Utopian Community explores the colony's role as an independent entity against an increasingly global backdrop and Artists and Artisans examines the independence and creativity of the artists themselves.

From examples of hand-crafted furniture such as George Eggers' oak Chest with Winter Landscape with its painted panels depicting stark winter landscapes; to jewelry and tableware designer Bertha Thompson's silver table spoon; as well as landscape paintings, ceramic bowls, textiles, photographs and hand-bound journals, Byrdcliffe tells the story of how a community driven by the desire to create beautiful, functional objects drew a diverse array of artisans to a pristine setting in the heart of the Catskills, where they flourished in a communal atmosphere of shared artistic endeavor.

To accompany the exhibit, N-YHS will host two intriguing public programs by expert curators with intimate knowledge of the arts & crafts movement in the early 20th Century. On Wednesday, March 23 Wendy Kaplan, Curator of Decorative Arts, Los Angeles County Museum of Art will deliver a discussion on the Arts and Crafts Movement in Europe and America, 1880-1920. On Wednesday, April 20, a gallery talk will be given by Nancy Green, Senior Curator of Prints, Drawings and Photographs at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University. Ms. Green is one of the original curators of the Byrdcliffe exhibition.


For a full list of upcoming public programs, please see our programs calendar or to make a reservation call (212) 817-8125 or visit: http://web.gc.cuny.edu/cepp/registration/index.html.

Additional programs and exhibitions at the New-York Historical Society are made possible in part with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts, a State Agency.

The Day Line: Holiday on The Hudson

July 01, 2005
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October 16, 2005

The Hudson River Day Line was the favorite way for New Yorkers to travel between Albany and New York City for a day in the country for more than 80 years. The exhibit highlights the Library's collection of photographs, advertising mockups, schedules, guidebooks, menus and other ephemera relating to the Hudson River Day Line, principally between 1890 and 1948.

Urban Views: American Cities 1717-1986

November 11, 2011
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April 22, 2012

This exhibition features large scale views of American cities. Throughout the centuries, cartographers and artists have been engaged in attempts to show the cityscape as a grandiose entity. This overall concept of the cityscape features works from the eighteenth century to the present, including maps, prints and photographs. The exhibition includes John Harris after William Burgis, A South Prospect of Ye Flourishing City of New York in the Province of New York in America (The Burgis View), 1717; Unknown artist, An Exact Prospect of CHARLESTON, the Metropolis of the Province of SOUTH CAROLINA, 1762; John Bornet, The City of New York from Union Hill, N.J., 1853; the Thomas Air Views of New York City, 1935-1980; and Claude Samton’s Photomontage of Canal Street, 1986.

John Harris (active 1685-1739) after William Burgis (active in the American colonies 1716-1731), A South Prospect of Ye Flourishing City of New York in the Province of New York in America, 1717. Engraving from four plates on four sheets. New-York Historical Society

Supported, in part, with a grant from the New York StateCouncil on the Arts, a State Agency.

 

Brooklyn Revealed

Teaser: 

Brooklyn Revealed offers a photographic tour of Brooklyn, through which visitors will learn about individual neighborhoods as well as the origin of more than 100 Brooklyn street names. The photographs, all of which come from the collections of the New-York Historical Society's Patricia D. Klingenstein Library, are paired with historical descriptions researched and written by New-York Historical's librarians. In instances where information about a specific street is inconclusive, visitors to the site are invited to submit their own ideas about how the street got its name. Visitors are also encouraged to submit the names of streets not included on the site.
 
Click here to view the full collection.
 

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Teaser: 

The New-York Historical Society Museum collection numbers over 60,000 objects, including works of art and artifacts spanning four centuries. Among its holdings are particularly rich and diverse collections that illuminate the historical and cultural life of New York City and the nation.

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Highlights >

Teaser: 

The New-York Historical Society Museum and Library houses a treasure trove of materials relating to the founding of our country, the history of art in America, and the history of New York and its people. The Museum houses more than 60,000 works and artifacts, including fine art, decorative art, historical artifacts, and ephemera. Fine art holdings include renowned Hudson River School landscapes; masterpieces of colonial and later portraiture; John James Audubon’s watercolors for The Birds of America; an encyclopedic collection of sculpture; and much more.

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