Museum Closure

The New-York Historical Society will close at 5 pm on Friday, October 31 for the DiMenna Children's History Museum Halloween party. For ticket information, click here.

Meet the Fledglings!

Speaker: 
The Wild Bird Fund
Sat, May 4th, 2013 | 2:00 pm

Recommended for ages 6 - 10
Saturday May 4th, 2 pm

Animals Alive! with Mr. Zelenka

Speaker: 
Jerry Zelenka
Sun, April 21st, 2013 | 1:30 pm

The wonders of nature are a touch away when you are introduced to the world of animals by Jerry Zelenka. While blending excitement and surprise with care and understanding, Mr. Zelenka helps audiences of all ages develop an appreciation for all living things—from the ordinary to the exotic!

Celebrate Earth Day during this hour-long program at the New-York Historical Society. The audience is encouraged to touch and pet a variety of animals, including birds, lizards, tarantulas, alligators and snakes!

Petropolis: A Social History of Urban Animal Companions

Jul 15 2003 - Nov 2 2005

The New-York Historical Society is pleased to announce the opening of the exhibition Petropolis: A Social History of Urban Animal Companions, which will be on view from July 15 to November 2, 2003. The Humane Society of New York is the Historical Society's institutional partner for this diverting and thought-provoking project, which will trace the history of the relationship between city dwellers and their pets, with an emphasis on New York City over the last two and a half centuries.

Seymour Joseph Guy (1824-1910), Girl and Kitten, ca. 1862. Oil on canvas. New-York Historical Society, The Robert L. Stuart Collection, S-18

Curated by New-York Historical Society Public Historian Kathleen Hulser and Associate Curator of Drawings Roberta J.M. Olson, Petropolis will survey the evolution of pets from their early appearances in the New World, where they were still linked to the wilderness or the world of ideas, through their gradual insinuation into the nuclear urban family. In many cases, these four-footed, feathered, or finned creatures, both fancy and quotidian, have displaced human offspring and spouses.

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Creative: Tronvig Group