Macy's Sunday Story Time: Subway Hijinks

Square photo: 
Sun, June 1st, 2014 | 11:30 am

Recommended for ages 3–7. 

Share your own subway adventures after reading about a sparrow that flies aboard the D train, then try to guess what the next stop is on My Subway Ride!

Subway Sparrow by Leyla Torres
My Subway Ride by Paul Dubois Jacobs and Jennifer Swender

From the seventeenth century to the twenty-first, through fiction and through fact, hear tales of NYC and the people who made it great.

Support for the Macy's Sunday Story Hour provided by the Macy's Foundation.

 

Macy's Sunday Story Time: Subway Stories

Sun, December 15th, 2013 | 11:30 am

Recommended for children ages 3–7. 

Subway Story by Julia Sarcone-Roach

Jessie the subway car loves carrying people throughout New York City, but has to adjust to her new role when newer subway cars come to the city. Join us for this story time to learn a unique and surprising way that the MTA has recycled subway cars since 2001.

From the seventeenth century to the twenty-first, through fiction and through fact, hear tales of NYC and the people who made it great.

Keith Haring All-Over

Through Spring 2014

A new installation in the Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture will feature everyday items transformed by famed New York artist Keith Haring. Keith Haring All-Over explores the artist’s use of unconventional surfaces: clothing, furniture and skin; as well as photographs and videos that document his process and passion for making ordinary objects into extraordinary works of art.

Keith Haring (1958-1990) "Into 84" exhibition poster, 1983.
Photograph: Tseng Kwong Chi
Model: choreographer Bill T. Jones
Photograph by Tseng Kwong Chi © Muna Tseng Dance Projects, Inc.
Keith Haring artwork © Keith Haring Foundation

Known for his chalk drawings on subway station walls and public murals, Keith Haring left his mark on nearly anything he could find—even the bodies of other artists—all painted with detail and finesse. Highlights of the installation include photos and videos of Haring’s collaborations with Bill T. Jones, Grace Jones, and Madonna that feature painted clothing or backdrops, including a jacket worn by Madonna when she performed at Haring’s first “Party of Life” birthday celebration in 1984.

The Universe of Keith Haring

Tue, August 20th, 2013 | 7:00 pm

Event Details

Jump into the world of one of Pop Art's most influential artists with this enthralling documentary.

The Universe of Keith Haring offers an affectionate and deeply personal glimpse into Haring's life, from his early years growing up in a small Pennsylvania town to his heyday as a world-renowned artist, rubbing shoulders with the likes of Madonna, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Yoko Ono and Andy Warhol, to his AIDS-related death at 31.

Grand Central: How a Train Station Transformed America

Speaker: 
Sam Roberts
Wed, July 31st, 2013 | 7:00 pm

EVENT DETAILS

In collaboration with the New-York Historical Society and Oxford University Press, the Bryant Park Reading Room presents a series of free lectures to stimulate your mind on popular topics including politics, biography, Civil War history, and more.

Macy's Sunday Story Time: Subway Hijinks

Sun, June 2nd, 2013 | 11:30 am

Recommended for children ages 4–7. Free with Museum admission.

Hear tales of New York and learn about your city’s history in these stories for young children. Themes are related to New York and American history, current holidays, and New-York Historical Society exhibitions.

Share your own subway adventures after reading about a sparrow that flies aboard the D train, then try to guess what the next stop is on My Subway Ride!

Subway Sparrow by Leyla Torres

My Subway Ride by Paul Dubois Jacobs and Jennifer Swender

Pop Shop Tokyo

Jan 29 2013 - Jul 28 2013

In honor of the installation of the ceiling from Keith Haring’s famous Pop Shop above the admissions area in the Robert H. and Clarice Smith New York Gallery of American History, the New-York Historical Society, in collaboration with the Keith Haring Foundation, has created a rotating display devoted to the Pop Shop in the Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture. The ceiling is a gift from the Haring Foundation, and all items in the Luce Center display are on loan from Foundation.

Keith Haring, Untitled, 1988. Sumi ink on paper. © Keith Haring Foundation

In 1986, internationally famed artist Keith Haring (1958-1990) opened the Pop Shop at 292 Lafayette Street. The following year, Haring collaborated with Japanese film producer Kaz Kuzui, and his American wife, film director Fran Rubel Kuzui on a Tokyo venue, in the Aoyama neighborhood.

Around Town Underground: Prints From The Collection Of Dave And Reba Williams

Aug 3 2004 - Nov 7 2004

When the first segment of Gotham's subway system opened on October 27, 1904, most Manhattanites lived and worked below 14th Street, while the rest of the island remained thinly settled. The original line operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) ran from City Hall to Grand Central Station, then West along 42nd Street to Times Square before continuing north to the Bronx. The urban landscape immediately began to change as the newly consolidated City grew outward, with the development of upper Manhattan and the Bronx, and upward as skyscrapers rose in downtown and midtown. For the first time New Yorkers were able to live in one neighborhood, commute to work elsewhere and travel about the city with ease.

Distance was overcome by speed. "City Hall to Harlem in fifteen minutes" the slogan promised. Reaching speeds of 40 miles per hour on its express lines, the new electric subway was three times as fast as the steam-powered elevated trains and six times as fast as electric street cars. A second line, the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Corporation (BRT), which later changed its name to the Brooklyn Manhattan Transit (BMT), was created in 1913. Both the IRT and BMT were publicly owned but privately operated.

Tunnel Vision: New York Subway Construction Photographs, 1900–1908

Nov 23 2004 - Feb 20 2005

On October 27, 1904, New York City's subway system officially opened, but talks to build an underground rail system began soon after London opened its subway in 1863. It wasn't until 1894 that a referendum was put on the ballot to generate financial support from the city and create the Rapid Transit Board, which was in charge of planning the route. The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was awarded the contract to build the first subway line. The Rapid Transit Board planned one original route, stretching from City Hall to 96th Street, which then split into two more routes from Broadway to 242nd Street and another that ran under the Harlem River into the Bronx. Bids were then solicited and construction began in 1900.

The New-York Historical Society's exhibit Tunnel Vision: New York Subway Construction Photographs, 19001908, explores the logistical challenges and remarkable effort that went into what at the time, was the largest construction project in the city's history. The exhibition showcases 80 photographs, culled from more than 5,000 from 19001908 in the Historical Society's Subway Construction Photograph Collection, all of which were a gift from the New York City Board of Transportation in 1950.

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Creative: Tronvig Group