Macy's Sunday Story Time: Subway Hijinks

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Sun, 06/01/2014 - 11:30
Sun, June 1st, 2014 | 11:30 am

Recommended for ages 3–7. 

Share your own subway adventures after reading about a sparrow that flies aboard the D train, then try to guess what the next stop is on My Subway Ride!

Subway Sparrow by Leyla Torres
My Subway Ride by Paul Dubois Jacobs and Jennifer Swender

From the seventeenth century to the twenty-first, through fiction and through fact, hear tales of NYC and the people who made it great.

Support for the Macy's Sunday Story Hour provided by the Macy's Foundation.

 

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Macy's Sunday Story Time: Subway Stories

Sun, 12/15/2013 - 11:30
Sun, December 15th, 2013 | 11:30 am

Recommended for children ages 3–7. 

Subway Story by Julia Sarcone-Roach

Jessie the subway car loves carrying people throughout New York City, but has to adjust to her new role when newer subway cars come to the city. Join us for this story time to learn a unique and surprising way that the MTA has recycled subway cars since 2001.

From the seventeenth century to the twenty-first, through fiction and through fact, hear tales of NYC and the people who made it great.

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Keith Haring All-Over

August 09, 2013
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May 18, 2014

A new installation in the Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture will feature everyday items transformed by famed New York artist Keith Haring. Keith Haring All-Over explores the artist’s use of unconventional surfaces: clothing, furniture and skin; as well as photographs and videos that document his process and passion for making ordinary objects into extraordinary works of art.

Keith Haring (1958-1990) "Into 84" exhibition poster, 1983.
Photograph: Tseng Kwong Chi
Model: choreographer Bill T. Jones
Photograph by Tseng Kwong Chi © Muna Tseng Dance Projects, Inc.
Keith Haring artwork © Keith Haring Foundation

Known for his chalk drawings on subway station walls and public murals, Keith Haring left his mark on nearly anything he could find—even the bodies of other artists—all painted with detail and finesse. Highlights of the installation include photos and videos of Haring’s collaborations with Bill T. Jones, Grace Jones, and Madonna that feature painted clothing or backdrops, including a jacket worn by Madonna when she performed at Haring’s first “Party of Life” birthday celebration in 1984.

All objects on view in the rotating display are on loan from the Keith Haring Foundation Archive. The Keith Haring Foundation donated the ceiling of the original Pop Shop to the New-York Historical Society, where the work, with its bold and lively design, now hovers above the admissions area.

The Universe of Keith Haring

Tue, 08/20/2013 - 19:00
Tue, August 20th, 2013 | 7:00 pm

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Jump into the world of one of Pop Art's most influential artists with this enthralling documentary.

The Universe of Keith Haring offers an affectionate and deeply personal glimpse into Haring's life, from his early years growing up in a small Pennsylvania town to his heyday as a world-renowned artist, rubbing shoulders with the likes of Madonna, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Yoko Ono and Andy Warhol, to his AIDS-related death at 31.

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Grand Central: How a Train Station Transformed America

Speaker: 
Sam Roberts
Wed, 07/31/2013 - 19:00
Wed, July 31st, 2013 | 7:00 pm

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In collaboration with the New-York Historical Society and Oxford University Press, the Bryant Park Reading Room presents a series of free lectures to stimulate your mind on popular topics including politics, biography, Civil War history, and more.

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Macy's Sunday Story Time: Subway Hijinks

Sun, 06/02/2013 - 11:30
Sun, June 2nd, 2013 | 11:30 am

Recommended for children ages 4–7. Free with Museum admission.

Hear tales of New York and learn about your city’s history in these stories for young children. Themes are related to New York and American history, current holidays, and New-York Historical Society exhibitions.

Share your own subway adventures after reading about a sparrow that flies aboard the D train, then try to guess what the next stop is on My Subway Ride!

Subway Sparrow by Leyla Torres

My Subway Ride by Paul Dubois Jacobs and Jennifer Swender

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Pop Shop Tokyo

January 29, 2013
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July 28, 2013

In honor of the installation of the ceiling from Keith Haring’s famous Pop Shop above the admissions area in the Robert H. and Clarice Smith New York Gallery of American History, the New-York Historical Society, in collaboration with the Keith Haring Foundation, has created a rotating display devoted to the Pop Shop in the Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture. The ceiling is a gift from the Haring Foundation, and all items in the Luce Center display are on loan from Foundation.

Keith Haring, Untitled, 1988. Sumi ink on paper. © Keith Haring Foundation

In 1986, internationally famed artist Keith Haring (1958-1990) opened the Pop Shop at 292 Lafayette Street. The following year, Haring collaborated with Japanese film producer Kaz Kuzui, and his American wife, film director Fran Rubel Kuzui on a Tokyo venue, in the Aoyama neighborhood.

The shop was made out of two shipping containers welded together to form one large room. While the shop was conceived very much in the image of its New York counterpart, many of the products were created by Haring to mirror Japan’s cultural traditions. Haring did extensive design work in Tokyo; fans and kimonos were manufactured in Kyoto, and rice bowl templates were painted and then produced in Nagoya. With speed and virtuosity, Haring began painting the interior of the shop on Wednesday, January 27, 1988 and finished the next day. The paint was still tacky on Friday, January 29 when he oversaw the installation of the displays in time for a press preview that evening. On Saturday, January 30, Pop Shop Tokyo opened to the public. However, sales were disappointing, and Haring noted “there are just too many Haring fakes available all over Tokyo and, this time, they’re really well done.” The shop closed in the summer of 1988.

 

Related Press

Blouin ArtInfoThe Keith Haring Pop Shop at the New York Historical Society Features a Tokyo Twist

Around Town Underground: Prints From The Collection Of Dave And Reba Williams

August 03, 2004
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November 07, 2004

When the first segment of Gotham's subway system opened on October 27, 1904, most Manhattanites lived and worked below 14th Street, while the rest of the island remained thinly settled. The original line operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) ran from City Hall to Grand Central Station, then West along 42nd Street to Times Square before continuing north to the Bronx. The urban landscape immediately began to change as the newly consolidated City grew outward, with the development of upper Manhattan and the Bronx, and upward as skyscrapers rose in downtown and midtown. For the first time New Yorkers were able to live in one neighborhood, commute to work elsewhere and travel about the city with ease.

Distance was overcome by speed. "City Hall to Harlem in fifteen minutes" the slogan promised. Reaching speeds of 40 miles per hour on its express lines, the new electric subway was three times as fast as the steam-powered elevated trains and six times as fast as electric street cars. A second line, the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Corporation (BRT), which later changed its name to the Brooklyn Manhattan Transit (BMT), was created in 1913. Both the IRT and BMT were publicly owned but privately operated. The municipal government owned and operated the IND line, which opened between 1932 and 1940. The city acquired the IRT and BMT lines at this time as well and unified all into a common network. This was the culminating phase of subway construction.

The urban metamorphosis taking place over the first half of the twentieth century provided visual artists with dramatic subject matter. City scenes began to outpace portraiture and landscapes as topics of choice. Printmaking was undergoing a renaissance at this time as well. While nineteenth-century printmakers were primarily focused on documentation, 20th-century printmakers felt freer to work in more stylized, expressionist and purely aesthetic modes. They experimented with new media and rediscovered methods such as lithography, screen printing, and woodcuts, primarily used for commercial purposes in the past. The New York City Graphics Division of the Works Progress Administration (1935–1943) facilitated the advancement of printing technology employing hundreds of artists during the depression. Most of the prints in this exhibition date from the 1920s to the 1950s.

Tunnel Vision: New York Subway Construction Photographs, 1900–1908

November 23, 2004
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February 20, 2005

On October 27, 1904, New York City's subway system officially opened, but talks to build an underground rail system began soon after London opened its subway in 1863. It wasn't until 1894 that a referendum was put on the ballot to generate financial support from the city and create the Rapid Transit Board, which was in charge of planning the route. The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was awarded the contract to build the first subway line. The Rapid Transit Board planned one original route, stretching from City Hall to 96th Street, which then split into two more routes from Broadway to 242nd Street and another that ran under the Harlem River into the Bronx. Bids were then solicited and construction began in 1900.

The New-York Historical Society's exhibit Tunnel Vision: New York Subway Construction Photographs, 19001908, explores the logistical challenges and remarkable effort that went into what at the time, was the largest construction project in the city's history. The exhibition showcases 80 photographs, culled from more than 5,000 from 19001908 in the Historical Society's Subway Construction Photograph Collection, all of which were a gift from the New York City Board of Transportation in 1950. Made primarily for insurance purposes, the overall collection contains nearly 60,000 photos showcasing buildings and streetscapes before, during and after construction of the of the entire subway system from 1900 until the last line was finished in 1947.

"These photographs capture the incredible human spirit behind this massive project and reveal the pride and willpower that laborers used in lieu of modern technology to make the subway a reality. This was truly a feat in modern engineering for the city to accomplish this task and Tunnel Vision will provide visitors with a snapshot into this extraordinary period of growth for New York," said New York Historical Society President & CEO Dr. Louise Mirrer.

The photographs and text panels document in vivid detail the "cut-and-cover" technique that the project's chief engineer, William Barclay Parsons developed. The process, in which crews dug a shallow excavation below the street surface and built a concrete and steel subsurface for trains to run through. The method was a painstaking process that required the relocation of thousands of sewer, gas and water mains and reinforcing buildings along the route. However, some of the exhibit photos clearly show how that many of the buildings did not survive and had to be demolished. While the IRT construction was marred by significant property damage, business disruptions and fatal accidents, it did succeed in addressing the city's basic objective: a cheap, reliable urban transit system. The five cent fare that remained in place until 1947 allowed an explosive growth of home construction throughout Upper Manhattan and the Bronx.

Most of the photographs from the early construction (1900–1908) are printed on platinum paper, which has proven to hold the images intact over the last century. The 65 prints in this exhibit are grouped geographically to show the transformation of key sites in New York City that were dramatically altered during the construction phase and then re-assembled afterward. Unfortunately, many historic structures did not survive the construction phase, or were re-rebuilt in a poor fashion to prevent them from living on today. "Tunnel Vision teaches a valuable lesson about the delicate nature of New York City's infrastructure and the challenges that lie ahead for any further expansion of the subway system," said Dr. Mirrer.

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