The Institute for Constitutional History sponsors or co-sponsors a variety of events during the academic year. Here is a partial list of upcoming and recent events:

Upcoming Events

The Jordan Saunders Seminar in Constitutional History for advanced graduate students and junior faculty
September 19, 26, October 10 and 24, 2014

SLAVERY AND THE LAWS OF WAR
Sponsored by the Institute for Constitutional History

INSTRUCTORS
James Oakes is Distinguished Professor of History and Graduate School Humanities Professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His most recent books are Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861-1865 and The Scorpion's Sting: Antislavery and the Coming of the Civil War.

John Fabian Witt is Allen H. Duffy Class of 1960 Professor of Law at Yale Law School. His most recent book Lincoln’s Code: The Laws of War in American History was awarded the 2013 Bancroft Prize, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, was selected for the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award, and was a New York Times Notable Book for 2012. Previous writing includes Patriots and Cosmopolitans: Hidden Histories of American Law (Harvard University Press, 2007), and The Accidental Republic: Crippled Workingmen, Destitute Widows, and the Remaking of American Law (Harvard University Press, 2004), as well as articles in the American Historical Review, the Columbia Law Review, the Harvard Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, and other scholarly journals. In 2010 he was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship for his project on the laws of war in American history.

PROGRAM CONTENT
The abolition of slavery and the advent of humanitarian limits in war have long been viewed as two of the great moral accomplishments of modern history. But we are only recently beginning to see how interconnected these two developments really were. How did Enlightenment laws of war affect the way Americans dealt with slavery in wartime? Or is that the wrong question? Should we ask, instead: How did the way Americans dealt with slavery and emancipation in wartime shape their understanding of the laws of war? Do the successes of antislavery help us understand the character of humanitarian constraints in war? And do the considerable failings of those humanitarian constraints in wartime shed light on the limits of Emancipation? Readings and discussions take up these questions by examining early American wars, beginning with the War of Independence and ending with the Civil War and Reconstruction.

LOGISTICS
Friday afternoons, 2–5 pm., September 19, 26, October 10, and 24. The seminar will meet at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, New York City.

APPLICATION PROCESS
The seminar is designed for graduate students and junior faculty in history, political science, law, and related disciplines. All participants will be expected to complete the assigned readings and participate in seminar discussions. Although the Institute cannot offer academic credit directly for the seminar, students may be able to earn graduate credit through their home departments by completing an independent research project in conjunction with the seminar. Please consult with your advisor and/or director of graduate studies about these possibilities. Space is limited, so applicants should send a copy of their c.v. and a short statement on how this seminar will be useful to them in their research, teaching, or professional development. Materials will be accepted only by email at MMarcus@nyhistory.org until May 1, 2014. Successful applicants will be notified soon thereafter.  

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
There is no tuition or other charge for this seminar, though participants will be expected to acquire the assigned books on their own.


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT
Maeva Marcus
Director, Institute for Constitutional History
New-York Historical Society and The George Washington University Law School
(202) 994-6562
MMarcus@nyhistory.org

The Jordan Saunders Seminar in Constitutional History
for advanced graduate students and junior faculty
September 11, 18, October 2, 30, November 13, and 20, 2014



THE HISTORY OF US ADMINISTRATIVE LAW
SPONSORED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY

INSTRUCTOR
Mark Tushnet is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. An expert on constitutional history, Professor Tushnet is the author of numerous works on constitutional history and law. His books include The Constitution in Wartime: Beyond Alarmism and Complacency; A Court Divided: The Rehnquist Court and the Future of Constitutional Law; The New Constitutional Order; Taking the Constitution Away From the Courts; and Making Constitutional Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1961-1991.

PROGRAM CONTENT
This Reading Group will examine the development of the administrative state from the Progressive Era through the Great Society. We will examine the interaction between academic theorizing about the administrative state as a Fourth Branch of government, and Supreme Court doctrine, and political controversies over the expansion of the administrative state and their resolution in theory and practice.

LOGISTICS
Thursday evenings, 6–8 p., September 11, 18, October 2, 30, November 13, and 20, 2014. The seminar will meet at The George Washington University Law School, 2000 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20052.

APPLICATION PROCESS
The seminar is designed for graduate students and junior faculty in history, political science, law, and related disciplines. All participants will be expected to complete the assigned readings and participate in seminar discussions. Although the Institute cannot offer academic credit directly for the seminar, students may be able to earn graduate credit through their home departments by completing an independent research project in conjunction with the seminar. Please consult with your advisor and/or director of graduate studies about these possibilities. Space is limited, so applicants should send a copy of their c.v. and a short statement on how this seminar will be useful to them in their research, teaching, or professional development. Materials will be accepted only by email at MMarcus@nyhistory.org until May 15, 2014. Successful applicants will be notified soon thereafter. For further information, please contact Maeva Marcus at (202) 994-6562 or send an email to MMarcus@nyhistory.org.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
There is no tuition or other charge for this seminar, though participants will be expected to acquire the assigned books on their own.

ABOUT ICH
The Institute for Constitutional History (ICH) is the nation’s premier institute dedicated to ensuring that future generations of Americans understand the substance and historical development of the U.S. Constitution. Located at the New York Historical Society and the George Washington University Law School, the Institute is co-sponsored by the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, and the American Political Science Association. The Association of American Law Schools is a cooperating entity. ICH prepares junior scholars and college instructors to convey to their readers and students the important role the Constitution has played in shaping American society. ICH also provides a national forum for the preparation and dissemination of humanistic, interdisciplinary scholarship on American constitutional history.

ABOUT ICH

The Institute for Constitutional History (ICH) is the nation’s premier institute dedicated to ensuring that future generations of Americans understand the substance and historical development of the U.S. Constitution. Located at the New-York Historical Society and the George Washington University Law School, the Institute is co-sponsored by the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, and the American Political Science Association. The Association of American Law Schools is a cooperating entity. ICH prepares junior scholars and college instructors to convey to their readers and students the important role the Constitution has played in shaping American society. ICH also provides a national forum for the preparation and dissemination of humanistic, interdisciplinary scholarship on American constitutional history.

 

 

The Graduate Institute for Constitutional History is supported, in part, by the Saunders Endowment for Constitutional History and a
“We the People” challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

 

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