NEH Summer Institute for School Teachers

NEH Summer Institute for School Teachers at the New-York Historical Society
“Race and Politics in the American Civil War”
July 13-25, 2014

Disclaimer: Schedule is subject to change

The Institute will run for two weeks, from July 13-25, 2014, at the New-York Historical Society. On the evening of Sunday, July 13, we will begin with a welcome dinner and roundtable discussion about experiences teaching the Civil War, raising particular questions or issues that tend to arise with this topic and addressing how we have dealt with issues of race when teaching the war in the past.

Each subsequent day will be divided into a morning and an afternoon session. Unless otherwise noted, morning sessions will run from 9–11 am and afternoon sessions will run from 1:30–3:30 pm. 11–1:30 will serve as both a lunch break and time for participants to conduct research and work on curriculum projects in the New-York Historical Society library, which will be open until 4:30 pm for Institute participants, but is not open on the weekends during the summer.

The sessions will provide an opportunity to either engage with historians on a particular topic, to participate in hands-on workshops around primary sources and pedagogy, or to conduct research and reading. Sessions with faculty historians will be conducted as brief lectures followed up by extended Q&A sessions and discussions, with primary sources integrated throughout as recommended by the scholars.

As a culminating project, participants will create a curricular mini-unit of up to five lesson plans that they will present on the last day of the Institute. The unit plans should focus on scholarship covered in the Institute, integrate new primary sources and pedagogical techniques, and address the Common Core Learning Standards. The units will be posted on the Institute page of the N-YHS website. The extensive collections of the New-York Historical Society Library and Museum that pertain to the time period in question will provide teachers with world-class resources upon which they can build their lessons. Project Co-Director Mia Nagawiecki will be available to participants throughout the Institute to provide research guidance and feedback on unit ideas and lesson plans.

Click here to download the Schedule at a Glance

Reading List
Books containing required readings will be provided to participants.

To be completed prior to the Institute:
Harold Holzer, The Civil War in 50 Objects (New York: Viking Press, 2013). The following chapters:

  • Introduction, by Eric Foner
  • Chapter 2, “The Human Face of Slavery: Daguerreotype of Caesar: A Slave, ca. 1850”
  • Chapter 14, “Divided Loyalties: Letter from Howard Cushing Wright to His Mother, 1861”
  • Chapter 17, “Distant Drums: Snare Drum, ca. 1860-1865,” “A Dentist Drills Lincoln: Writing the Emancipation Proclamation, Etching by Adalbert Johann Volck, 1863”
  • Chapter 44, “Counting Votes, Lincoln’s Way: Projections of November 1864 Election, Abraham Lincoln, 1864”
  • Chapter 46, “The Draft That Really Ended the War: Terms of Surrender, April 9, 1865, Ulysses S. Grant”

Over the course of the two weeks, we will read selected excerpts from the following in addition to selected primary sources and scholarly articles, which will be provided as a course pack:

Ira Berlin, Freedom's Soldiers: The Black Military Experience in the Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 1998).

Ira Berlin, "Glory Be," Radical History Review 53 (Spring 1992): 141-148. 

Ira Berlin and Leslie M. Harris, eds., Slavery in New York (New York: The New Press, 2005).

David Blight, Race and Reunion: The American Civil War in American Memory (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2001).

Drew Gilpin Faust, Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004).

Eric Foner, The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery (New York: Norton, 2010).

Harold Holzer, Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context, and Memory (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2012).

Harold Holzer, ed., Lincoln and New York (New York and London: Philip Wilson, 2009)

James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003).

James Oakes, Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States (New York: Norton, 2013).

Barnet Schecter, The Devil’s Own Work: The Civil War Draft Riots and the Fight to Reconstruct America (New York: Walker, 2005).

Manisha Sinha, Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861-1865 (New York: Norton, 2013).

John Stauffer, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln (New York: Twelve, 2008).

Program of Study

Week 1: Pre-War through the Draft Riots

Sunday, 7/13   Participants arrive

EVENING:    
Welcome Reception at the New-York Historical Society

Monday, 7/14  Introductions, Orientation, and Overview
MORNING:
Historian Presentation: Harold Holzer, Project co-Director, N-YHS Roger Hertog Fellow, “The Civil War through Objects at the New-York Historical Society”

Read: Harold Holzer, “The Human Face of Slavery: Daguerreotype of Caesar: A Slave, ca. 1850,” “Divided Loyalties: Letter from Howard Cushing Wright to His Mother, 1861,” “Distant Drums: Snare Drum, ca. 1860-1865,” “A Dentist Drills Lincoln: Writing the Emancipation Proclamation, Etching by Adalbert Johann Volck, 1863,” “Counting Votes, Lincoln’s Way: Projections of November 1864 Election, Abraham Lincoln, 1864,” “The Draft That Really Ended the War: Terms of Surrender, April 9, 1865, Ulysses S. Grant” in The Civil War in 50 Objects (New York: Viking Press, 2013).

AFTERNOON: (abbreviated lunch break, afternoon runs 12–3 pm)
Pedagogy Session: Mia Nagawiecki, Project co-Director, N-YHS Director of Education, “Objects Tell Stories: Teaching History through Artifacts”

Library and Research Orientation: Valerie Paley and N-YHS Librarians,

Discussion of Curriculum Projects: Mia Nagawiecki

Tuesday, 7/15  Race in Antebellum America and the Early War: North and South Part I
MORNING:
Site Visit: African Burial Ground National Monument, New York

Read: Ira Berlin and Leslie M. Harris, “Uncovering, Discovering, and Recovering: Digging in New York’s Slave Past Beyond the African Burial Ground;” and Patrick Rael, “The Long Death of Slavery,” in Ira Berlin and Leslie M. Harris, eds., Slavery in New York (New York: The New Press, 2005).

AFTERNOON:
Historian Presentation: Craig Symonds, United States Naval Academy, “1859-1861: The Outbreak of the Civil War”

3:30-4:30 pm Library Day, Group 1

Read: James McPherson, “The Revolution of 1860” in Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003).

Weds, 7/16      Race in Antebellum America and the Early War: North and South Part II
MORNING:
Historian Presentation: Manisha Sinha, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, “Slavery, Anti-Slavery, and the Sectional Conflict”

Read: Manisha Sinha, “Secession” in The Counterrevolution of Slavery: Politics and Ideology in Antebellum South Carolina (University of North Carolina Press, 2000); James Oakes, “August 8, 1861: Emancipation Begins” in Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861-1865 (New York: Norton, 2013).

AFTERNOON:
Primary Source Workshop: Nagawiecki, “The Case of William Dixon: Black Vigilance in NYC”

3:30-4:30 pm Library Day, Group 2

Thurs, 7/17      Union and Emancipation: Lincoln, Douglass, and the Emancipation Proclamation
MORNING:
Historian Presentation: Eric Foner, Columbia University, “Changing the Tide of War: Lincoln, Union, and Emancipation”

Read: Eric Foner, “‘Forever Free’: The Coming of Emancipation” in The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery (New York: Norton, 2010); Harold Holzer, “Emancipator versus Pettifogger” in Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context, and Memory (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2012).

AFTERNOON:
Historian Presentation: John Stauffer, Harvard University, “Frederick Douglass in the Civil War”

Read: John Stauffer, “Abolitionist Warrior and War President,” Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln (New York: Twelve, 2008).

3:30-4:30 pm Library Day, Group 3

Friday, 7/18     The Civil War Draft Riots
MORNING:
Historian Presentation: Barnet Schecter, “Freedom Rising, Freedom Curtailed: The Emancipation Proclamation and the New York City Draft Riots”

Read: Barnet Schecter, “Emancipation and Its Enemies,” and “’Chased, Stoned, and Beaten’: ‘A Crusade Against Negroes’” in The Devil’s Own Work: The Civil War Draft Riots and the Fight to Reconstruct America (New York: Walker, 2005).

AFTERNOON: (abbreviated lunch break, afternoon session runs 12-3:30 pm)
Walking/Bus Tour: Barnet Schecter and Harold Holzer, “Civil War Sites in New York City”

3:30-4:30 pm Optional Library Day

Week 2: War’s End and Legacies
Monday, 7/21  African American Enlistment
MORNING:
Historian Presentation: Donald Shaffer, “The United States Colored Troops”

Read: Ira Berlin, Joseph Patrick Reidy, Leslie S. Rowland, “Introduction” in Freedom's Soldiers: The Black Military Experience in the Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 1998); Ira Berlin, "Glory Be," Radical History Review 53 (Spring 1992): 141-148. 

AFTERNOON: (extended afternoon session, 1:30-4:30 pm)
Film Screening and Discussion, Holzer and Shaffer, Glory

Tuesday, 7/22  Women and the Fight, Visual Culture of the Civil War
MORNING:
Historian Presentation: Valerie Paley, N-YHS Historian and Vice President for Scholarly Programs, “The United States Sanitary Commission, the Women’s Central Relief Association, and the Popular Cause of War”

Exhibition Tour: Paley and Nagawiecki, Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the American Civil War

Read: Catherine Clinton, "Mrs. Lincoln in Wartime New York," in Harold Holzer, ed., Lincoln and New York (New York and London: Philip Wilson, 2009); Drew Gilpin Faust, “We Must Go to Work, Too,” and “Sick and Tired of This Horrid War: Patriotism, Sacrifice, and Self-Interest” in Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004).

AFTERNOON:         
Historian Presentation: Holzer, “The Civil War in Caricature and Cartoon”

Primary Source Workshop: Nagawiecki, “Civil War Political Cartoons in the Classroom”

3:30-4:3p pm Library Day, Group 1

Weds, 7/23      The Thirteenth Amendment
MORNING:
Film Screening: Lincoln                     

AFTERNOON: (abbreviated break 11:30 am-12 pm, working lunch 12-1 pm)
12-1 pm - Film Discussion and Historian Presentation: Holzer, “The Fight for the Thirteenth Amendment: Lincoln, Congress, Soldiers, and Runaways”

Read: Oakes, James, “Our Fathers Were Mistaken” in Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States (New York: Norton, 2013).

1–3:30 pm – Project work time

3:30–4:30 pm – Library Day, Group 2

Thurs, 7/24      Image, History, and Memory
MORNING:
Historian Discussion and Film Screening: Holzer, “Image and Memory: The Birth of a Nation, a Case Study” Selected Scenes

AFTERNOON: (extended afternoon session, 1:30-5 pm)
Panel Discussion: Eric Foner, Columbia University; Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Harvard University; John Stauffer, Harvard University; moderated by Holzer: “The Civil War in History and Memory: Then and Now”

Read: David Blight, “The Lost Cause and Causes Not Lost,” and “Black Memory and Progress of the Race” in Race and Reunion: The American Civil War in American Memory (Cambridge: Havard University Press, 2001).

3:30–4:30 pm - Library Day, Group 3

Friday, 7/25     Participant Presentations
MORNING:
Participant Presentations

AFTERNOON:
Participant Presentations
Reflection and Wrap-Up, Holzer and Nagawiecki

“Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.”

Creative: Tronvig Group