The Underground Railroad Collection is a sampling of objects and paintings from the New-York Historical Society Museum that tells the story of resistance to slavery, the movement of fugitives, and the experiences and achievements of the enslaved and the free African American community of the North. 

Many of the New-York Historical Society's founders and nineteenth-century members had deep roots in New York; a significant number of them descended from families who immigrated in the seventeenth century.

In 1863 Lucy Bakewell Audubon, the widow of John James Audubon, sold to the New-York Historical Society her husband’s preparatory watercolors for his seminal work The Birds of America (published serially in London between 1827 and 1838).

The New-York Historical Society holds one of the oldest and most comprehensive collections of landscape painting by artists of the Hudson River School, the first school of truly American art to garner worldwide recognition and fame.

The avant-garde sculptor Elie Nadelman (1882–1946) is widely recognized for his elegant and spare modernist sculpture. Less well-known is Nadelman's role as a pioneer in collecting folk art in this country and his impressive material legacy acquired by the New-York Historical Society in 1937.

The New-York Historical Society's entire collection of 132 Tiffany lamps and three windows came as the gift of a single collector, Dr. Egon Neustadt, in 1984. A limited selection of this collection is on view in the Luce Center.

The games that entertained Americans from the 1840s to the 1920s offer a fascinating window on the values, beliefs and aspirations of a nation undergoing tremendous change.

Bella C. Landauer (1874–1960) was an insatiable collector of objects made for business and advertising purposes. In 1926, she gave a large portion of her collection to the New-York Historical Society.

Creative: Tronvig Group