Group Tour Pricing

 

TYPE GROUP GROUP WITH GUIDED TOUR
College Students $100 for up to 25 students $150 for up to 25 students

 

Reserve a 60-minute private Guided Tour with one of our curator-trained docents. Our docent-led tours are un-scripted and unique—each tour is a new experience!

Exclusive before- and after-hours tours, group space rentals, and catered meals are available upon request. Looking for something in particular? Let us know how we can customize your visit!

For more information, call (212) 873-3400 x352 or email Group.Tours@nyhistory.org

Special Exhibition Tours We Offer

Tour: Tattooed New York
February 3, 2017 – April 30, 2017

For more than 300 years, New York City has played a major role in the development of modern tattooing. See centuries of illustrations and photographs of tattooed New Yorkers—including one of the earliest recordings in Western accounts of a pictograph by a Seneca warrior—plus Thomas Edison’s electric pen, among 250 other images and objects. Whether you’re a tattoo fanatic or you just love incredible art, this tour sheds light on a fascinating community of New York’s past and present.

Tour: Saving Washington
April 29, 2017 - July 30, 2017

We know the stories of our Founding Fathers, but what about the Founding Mothers who worked right alongside them to implement the Constitution “on the ground”? The untold stories of women of the early republic—and in particular First Lady Dolley Madison—come to life on this fascinating tour of artworks, books, documents, clothing, jewelry, and housewares, as well as immersive interactive digital experiences. Learn how women shaped our democracy on this illuminating docent-led tour.

Tour: World War I Beyond the Trenches
May 26, 2017 – September 3, 2017

How did American artists respond to the First World War? On the 100th anniversary of the U.S. entering the war, explore how artists across generations, aesthetic sensibilities, and the political spectrum used their work to depict, memorialize, promote, or oppose the divisive conflict. On our docent-led tour, see works like John Singer Sargent’s spectacular “Gassed,” which hasn’t traveled to New York in decades. Plus, marvel at works by Georgia O’Keeffe, Horace Pippin, and Man Ray, among others. 

 

Permanent Exhibition Tours We Offer

Tour: Collector's Choice: Highlights from the Permanent Collection
Ongoing

For more than 200 years, the New-York Historical Society has been preserving and exhibiting artwork. Dive into the stories of many illustrious artworks on our docent-led gallery tour. Learn about some of the most renowned works in our collection, ranging in date from the 14th through the 21st centuries, including Thomas Cole's iconic "Course of Empire" series and Charles Willson Peale's Peale Family Portrait. Plus, marvel at Picasso’s magnificent Le Tricorne ballet curtain, the largest piece on view in the United States by the Spanish artist.

Tour: Highlights from the Permanent Collection
Ongoing

Explore our world-renowned permanent collection on our one-of-a-kind highlights tour. Our specially trained guides lead you through the Smith Gallery, showcasing New York’s central role in the creation of the United States. The tour continues on the second floor where a selection of our more than 40,000 historic objects tells the story of Gotham, from its early days as a Dutch colony to the cosmopolitan metropolis of today.

Tour: Women of the Collection: The Fight for Equality in America
Ongoing

Despite enormous obstacles, women across the spectrum of race and class exercised power and effected change even before they could access the ballot box. Discover the untold stories of women whose contributions to American culture, politics, and society altered the course of history.

Tour: Lamps of Tiffany Studios: Style, Beauty, and Design
Ongoing

Experience our collection of Tiffany lamps—one of the world’s largest and most encyclopedic—in a dazzling new two-story gallery. See more than 100 examples of this elegant American art form and hear the personal stories of head designer Clara Driscoll and her team in the Glassmaking Department known as the “Tiffany Girls,” whose contributions were nearly lost to history.

Tour: Made in New York: Selections from the Permanent Collection
Ongoing

New York’s unique entrepreneurial spirit has inspired objects that stand alone in design and functionality. Hear the dynamic stories of American history as told through extraordinary and everyday objects from our collection. Discover what makes New York the capital of creativity!

Tour: Curiosities of the Collection
Ongoing

The forgotten, often perplexing histories of the United States can be told through artifacts left behind. Since 1804, the New-York Historical Society has been preserving and exhibiting objects that tell captivating stories. History uncovered on this tour will include the 19th-century fascination with phrenology, or skull-reading; the lost art of cigar ribbon manufacturing; and the 1863 draft lottery that sparked the deadliest civil disturbance in our nation’s history.

Tour: New York, 1600–Present: Design Your Own Tour
Ongoing

How can the past inform our present? Discover the New York of yesterday and today through artifacts and works of art from our collection, excavated from city streets and donated by illustrious New Yorkers. Select the century in New York history that most interests you and we’ll tailor a tour to fit!

1600–1700: Before the city was New York, it was New Amsterdam—a remote New World trading outpost in a global Dutch empire. After coming under British rule in 1664, New York retained its diverse, multilingual population and entrepreneurial spirit, remaining a city that existed first and foremost as a financial and trading center.

1700–1800: Under British occupation from 1776 to 1783, New York—a hotbed of contention between Patriots and Loyalists—felt the effects of nearby battles. After the Revolution, New Yorkers witnessed Washington’s inauguration and the city became the first U.S. capital. During this period, one in five New Yorkers lived in bondage.

1800–1900: Fueled by immigration and innovations like the Erie Canal and Brooklyn Bridge, New York grew from a port city concentrated in lower Manhattan to a unified metropolis. During and after the Civil War, New York politics became increasingly contentious. As the 19th century came to a close, the Progressive Movement emerged in response to the excesses of Tammany Hall and the Gilded Age.

1900–2000: During the tumult of the 20th century’s traumatic world wars, ordinary New Yorkers contributed to the war effort. Following World War II, New York emerged on the international stage as a global capital with a unique identity, and its landmarks became recognizable worldwide as New York culture was captured in song, on stage, and on film.

Creative: Tronvig Group